Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

592 resources found.

Encouraging benchmarking in e-learning

Alan Smith
University of Southern Queensland
2010
University of Southern Queensland
Australasian Council on Open, Distance and E-learning (ACODE)
Final Report Download Document (198.58 KB)

Undergraduate leadership development – leadership literature review notes

Lynne Cohen
Edith Cowan University
2011
Edith Cowan University
Literature Review Download Document (169.71 KB)

Undergraduate leadership development – programs and models

Lynne Cohen
Edith Cowan University
2011
Edith Cowan University
Programs & Models Download Document (289.51 KB)

Engineering and ICT Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

Sue Wright, Roger Hadgraft, Ian Cameron
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic standards covering programs of study for a bachelor degree with a major in engineering or ICT. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-29-7

Engineering ICT LTAS Statement Download Document (669.5 KB)

History Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

I.M. Hay
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic standards covering programs of study for a bachelor degree with a major in history. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-31-0

History LTAS Statement Download Document (788.99 KB)

Geography Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

I.M. Hay
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic standards covering programs of study for a bachelor degree with a major in geography. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-32-7

Geography LTAS Statement Download Document (759.02 KB)

Bachelor of Laws Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

Sally Kift, Mark Israel, Rachael Field
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic standards covering programs of study for a Bachelor of Laws degree. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-33-4

Law LTAS Statement Download Document (1.33 MB)

Quality assessment: linking assessment tasks and teaching outcomes in the social sciences

Jennifer Gore, James Ladwig, Wendy Elsworth, Hywel Ellis, Robert Parkes, Tom Griffiths
The University of Newcastle
2009
The University of Newcastle
Framework Download Document (535.62 KB)

The framework is diagrammatically portrayed as a circle with the elements of the previously developed Assessment characteristics as the inner circle and a range of factors identified as Student Support and Significance as the outer circle. The purpose of the framework is to enable academics to have increased support in assessment task design. It is located in a philosophy of social constructivism, which needs to be recognised by those using the framework and while generalisable, it is likely to be of particular interest to those teaching in the social sciences. The instructions on the use of the guide are clear, which allows for easy navigation. Explanations and definitions are given of each of the elements of the model and suggestions for the improvement of tasks provide assistance for those coming to assessment de novo. There may be some scepticism about the characteristic of meta-language but it is a useful debate to have, given that it is more particular to education than some other social sciences. The material on significance also is embedded in the philosophical approach and it provides important material on understanding what students bring to learning and how this intersects with assessment. This, together with the Student Support material, brings strengths to the model which are often not considered by academics but which are vital to ensure authentic learning. Explicit quality criteria, high expectations and student direction articulate those areas of assessment which frequently are not considered by academics, to the frustration of students. The elaborations and suggestions for academics are a real strength of this model.  The report provides pro forma and samples which add to the value of the resource. 

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies: Quality Criteria

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Quality Criteria Download Document (525.49 KB)

 

This document is one of a suite of resources from a project focused on developing appropriate evaluation quality criteria for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary doctoral research for use by students, supervisors and others. The goal was to provide a frame that is consistent across different discipline areas, as different disciplines judge quality in different ways, but specifically addressing implications for transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research. 

This resource provides the identified quality criteria for evaluating transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research theses. It provides analyses of: the nature of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research; difficulties associated with judging its quality; pedagogy in the area; and a literature review on the topic. It culminates in a set of criteria developed through the project and literature-based analyses. The criteria also emerge from practice and workshop discussions involving experienced transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary supervisors. 

This resource is therefore an informative document on these areas for the practice of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research study and supervision as well as for those conducting research in the area. Readers may want to read the whole document for the coverage of issues in the field. Alternatively, for practical purposes, they can turn to the seven identified generic criteria of research quality on pages 17 and 18 and summary of interpretations for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research. However, the discussion of the generic quality criteria and application for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research provided on pages 7-16 is very readable and well-worth reading to gain understanding of the final summary. 

The resource is valuable for supervisors and students engaging in transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research. It could also be used by Thesis Examination Offices in higher education institutions in Australia and internationally in order to reflect on the appropriateness of current thesis examination procedures and criteria for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research examinations and identification of suitable examiners. 

The title of this work shows a focus on doctoral research students and supervision. However, the materials could be modified to suit transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research outcomes for any level of higher education, undergraduate or postgraduate.

Completed and Continuing Fellowships 2011

ALTC
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

This report outlines all ALTC-funded fellowships and is presented in two sections, including a short biography for each Fellow. The first section summarises the outcomes of completed fellowships, with a description of the issues addressed and the outcomes and tools developed. The report then focuses on continuing programs, providing a brief background and progress to date.

Completed and Continuing Fellowships 2011 Report Download Document (1.12 MB)

Health, Medicine and Veterinary Science Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

Maree O'Keefe, Amanda Henderson, Rachael Pitt
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic threshold learning outcomes common across healthcare at professional entry-level bachelor degrees. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-30-3

Health, Medicine and Veterinary LTAS Statement v2 Download Document (1.44 MB)

Review of the Australian Awards for University Teaching

Roy Ballantyne, Jan Packer, Georgia Smeal, John Bain
2003
Review of AAUT Download Document (4.39 MB)

Architecture Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

Susan Savage
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic standards covering programs of study for a Master of Architecture degree. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010-11 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-28-0

 

Architecture LTAS Statement Download Document (621.23 KB)

Managing educational change in the ICT discipline at the tertiary education level: Final Report

Tony Koppi, Fazel Naghdy
University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Monash, QUT
Final Report Download Document (1.17 MB)

This is an outstanding, comprehensive analysis of the state of tertiary ICT education in Australia, including the need for some change and how this should be approached. The report includes extensive survey data from the perspectives of academic staff, recent graduates and (to a lesser extent) employers of ICT graduates. It is noteworthy that these surveys have been conducted across a very representative component of the Australian sector, giving confidence about the broad relevance of the findings.

The report is a "must read" for anyone undertaking a serious review of their ICT curriculum or teaching, and indeed is worth the attention of anyone seeking a good example of such a review, irrespective of discipline. It is particularly illuminating to observe the alignment, of lack thereof, between what is taught at University and what students require in the workforce. Of course, there is an ongoing debate about how tightly Universities should aim for work-ready graduates, but the data in this report from recent ICT graduates are relevant to all tertiary programs in this area.

The report is lengthy, with a wealth of (quantitative and qualitative) data and substantial data analysis. There are nine recommendations, of which three focus on the ICT sector and its perceptions by stakeholders, and six address aspects of the curriculum and teaching; these latter recommendations are most relevant for discipline standards. The report is beautifully written and well-organised, and argues its case convincingly. The reader will benefit from either a short reading or a comprehensive analysis.

Composite Report on Projects Funded Through the Australian Universities Teaching Committee 2000-2003

Owen Hicks
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2004
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
Report Download Document (402.13 KB)

Learning and Teaching Guide: A handbook to support institutions in implementing programs for assisting the development of communication and life skills in veterinary students

Jennifer Mills, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan, John Baguley
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Handbook Download Document (4.54 MB)

 

This 80-page handbook provides seven lesson plans, four assessment tools, fifteen supporting materials such as marking rubrics, and a bibliography to support training in communication for veterinary care.  The handbook enables a lecturer to teach skills and insights into empathy – essentially emotional intelligence – for professional veterinary practice, with particular attention to the owner-pet bond.

Teaching a professional skills module for veterinary students?  This handbook is meant for you.  If you are trying to teach professional skills in any field, such as engineering, this handbook can reveal useful insights, though the examples provided will not be directly applicable.

The handbook’s lesson plans are presented succinctly.  They include a one-paragraph review of the literature to justify the need for the lesson as well as a list of steps required to complete the activity.  Detailed resources may be found at the back of the handbook.  This format keeps the lesson plan to a single page, presenting it as an outline to help selection and stimulate thought.

The lesson plans are not provided with an estimate of how long each activity can take.  Nor are there strategies for demonstrating to colleagues why one should include each lesson in the curriculum, though one can follow up with the project principals for these insights.

It will take some effort to integrate these communication activities into science-based subjects, for those who have insufficient ‘space’ in their professional skills modules, or who indeed have no such module.  That said, the teaching strategies are well conceived, with lots of student group discussion and background theory to help the lecturer to understand, and relay to the students, key aspects of the nature of humans and their pets.

Those who are familiar with facilitating discussions will find adopting these materials to be easier than those who lack such experience.  If you are not yet comfortable with facilitative teaching, then you might want to have a colleague who specialises in communication at your side during development and implementation of lessons (e.g., someone from psychology or doctor-patient communication training).  Note that some exercises call for people to role-play clients; so check on resources needed before launching into an element of this curriculum. The bottom line – good stuff, but you may need a coach by your side (or on the phone).

Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Resources for Geography and History

Iain Hay
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Resources to support the development and use of academic learning and teaching standards for the geography and history disciplines. These resources were developed during the Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Project.

LTAS Resources for Geography and History Download Document (101.33 KB)

Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Resources for Health, Medicine and Veterinary Science

Amanda Henderson, Maree O'Keefe
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Resources to support the development and use of academic learning and teaching standards for the health, medicine and veterinary science disciplines. These resources were developed during the Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Project.

LTAS Resources for Health, Medicine and Veterinary Science Download Document (82.81 KB)

Resources to assist discipline communities to define threshold learning outcomes

Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

This resource is an outcome of the ALTC's Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Project and has been prepared to assist discipline commuties define threshold learning outcomes.

Resource Download Document (331.8 KB)

Academic leadership: Fundamental building blocks

Tricia Vilkinas, Betty Leask, Richard Ladyshewsky
University of South Australia
2009
University of South Australia
CUT
Resource book Download Document (3.95 MB)

Go to pages

You are on page 1