Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

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2 resources found for ‘animations’.

Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods to Enhance Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ

 

This website provides information, links, and resources about how to teach communication and professional skills to veterinary students.  The web pages offer a description of the ALTC project, the opportunity to download outputs such as a workbook, and contact information for key individuals who were involved in the project.

If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the resources provided will be helpful.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case for the value of this material to veterinary students.

It is evident that the authors have engaged someone in developing these materials who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  The case studies, scenarios, role plays, and suggested discussion topics – offered in the downloadable workbook – have the ring of truth to them.  Background discussion from the project report (and, to some extent, the workbook) cites relevant literature on practitioner-client communication.  Also, evidence is provided documenting the impact of these learning activities on students.

If you are not teaching veterinary students and you are a lateral thinker, you could adapt the materials presented here for another discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided would be for students in engineering, for example.

In initially using these materials, it would be handy to have a communication specialist looking over your shoulder.  No matter how comprehensive the explanation of learning activities is, you may not ‘hit the mark’ unless you are already familiar with the style of teaching that is required and be comfortable with the issues that may arise in the guided discussions.

Note that not everything on the website will prove to be useful.  The collection of materials, from workbook to conference posters, seems extensive, but it is also eclectic - a bit of a grab bag.  Head straight for the Handbook for useful information.  Turn to the Project Report for more in depth information on how the materials faired in tests with students.

Enhancing Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students: Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Final report Download Document (218.38 KB)

This 25-page report details how the project team developed communication skills resources for those who teach professional skills modules for veterinary students.  If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the Workbook that this team produced will be of the most help, and this report can give you additional confidence in using it.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case in this report for the value of the material to veterinary students.  It is evident that the authors have engaged someone who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  There is discussion of the theory of emotional intelligence and similar factors that one must understand to address deficits in student training that the report identifies in the literature and in surveys of students.  It is interesting to read about what their surveys found to be challenging in client consultations by male students but not as challenging by female students, and vice versa.    Evidence is provided documenting the impact of the learning activities developed in this project on students, and that should provide you with confidence and rationale for employing these materials, as alluded to above.  If you are not teaching veterinary students, and you are a lateral thinker, you could read into the efforts documented here how to create materials for your own discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided could be in creating teaching strategies to use with students in engineering, for example.  If you would like to understand the study results in depth, it would be handy to have a communication specialist to consult.   Note that not everything in this report will prove to be useful.  There is a collection of research outcomes and theoretical justifications that could be handy as background information, but they are not essential for employing the actual teaching materials, which are in the Workbook.