Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

15 resources found for ‘authentic assessment’.

An integrated system for online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) for web-based courses

Craig Engstrom, Peter Hay, Doune Macdonald, Peter Brukner, Karim Khan
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland
The University of British Columbia (Canada), The University of Melbourne
Final Report Download Document (866.97 KB)

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW

The main focus of the resource is group assessment relevant to a range of disciplines, for example media, communication, creative arts and medical disciplines. It includes 13 case studies (of majors from four universities), explores key issues in relation to group assessment, and includes links to the research literature and keynotes by leading authorities in assessment. The resource is useful for academic staff designing units, courses and programs and who may be intending to incorporate group work. The case studies are useful for both design and assessment samples and for benchmarking purposes. Video is used to develop the key issues: a rationale for group assessment; creating and managing groups; group marks; peer assessment; technology; transparency; and feedback. The presence of both staff and student views and experiences in the video material imparts a particular level of credibility to the discussion of issues and principles. Keynote addresses, on policy, design, implementation, evaluation and learning, from leading authorities in assessment principles, and the practice of group and collaborative assessment, are also included. The case studies are of particular interest to course, unit and program designers as well as academic developers and planning and quality staff, while the issues are of interest to all staff grappling with collaborative or group assessment. The videos, for example those in relation to the rationale for team work, may also be of benefit to students. Users should be made aware of the login link to the forum, an issue which may detract from the website's currency. The resource recognises the competing demands on the user's time and the cognitive load requirements though an accessible design template (using three main and four supplementary links), the use of short videos, and the links to the research literature.  The user does not require prior experience, domain-specific knowledge or specific IT requirements to use the resource. The resource deals with the problematic issue of group assessment and solves key issues in a concise and user-friendly way. It is easy to read and navigate and does not need to be read in conjunction with the project report. It is a practical, easy-to-access and use website on group assessment and team work.

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW
Final Report Download Document (188.02 KB)

Assessment 2020: Seven propositions for assessment reform in higher education

David Boud
University of Technology, Sydney
2010
University of Technology, Sydney
Fellowship Final Report Download Document (581.44 KB)
Assessment 2020: seven propositions for assessment reform in higher education Download Document (156.13 KB)

The web site is a rich source of information and inspiration for those setting, designing or redesigning, assessment tasks. It indicates the purpose for the materials, making it clear that the content is relevant for experienced teachers and educational developers and that the site is not designed for those seeking an introduction to assessment. The site contains only minimal information on items such as rubrics and marking schemes. This is not a deficiency; rather it is a reinforcement of the purpose of the site which is to facilitate change in the emphasis on assessment of current learning to assessment that values self-directed, self-managed and self-evaluated learners.

The web site is organised around the key principles of engaging students, setting authentic activities, scaffolding students in designing some assessments, setting integrative tasks, fostering learning and judgement, modelling and practice, working with peers, as well as giving and receiving feedback. Each section succinctly describes a principle, provides a brief articulation of how it could be implemented and then has a link to discipline examples.

The section titled "Towards informed judgement" is a particularly useful one and worth reading. The range of discipline examples for assessment for future learning is limited because only a few teachers are engaging with this issue. There are highly relevant literature references on assessment practices for future learning attributes.

The reader should also download the well-written synthesis of where assessment practices should be heading over the coming years, "Assessment 2020: Seven propositions for assessment reform in higher education".

Authentic assessment in practice settings: a participatory design approach

Di Bloomfield, Belinda Chambers, Suzanne Egan, James Goulding, Peter Reimann, Fran Waugh, Simone White
The University of Sydney
2013
The University of Sydney
Charles Sturt University, Monash University
Final report Download Document (1.66 MB)

Building academic staff capacity for using eSimulations in professional education for experience transfer

Jacob Cybulski, Dale Holt, Stephen Segrave, David O'Brien, Judy Munro, Brian Corbitt, Ross Smith, Martin Dick, Ian Searle, Hossein Zadeh, Pradipta Sarkar, Mike Keppell, Deb Murdoch, Ben Bradley
Deakin University
2010
Deakin University

E-simulations are capable of immersing learners in ‘authentic’ e-learning environments, providing innovative and valid teaching and assessment that is seamlessly interwoven in the process of skill acquisition and experience transfer. The Resource Guide contributes to the development of the capacities required by educational institutions to design, develop, implement, evaluate and research the impacts of e-Simulations. The project website provides additional supporting documents and useful links.

CSU, RMIT
Final Report Download Document (7.68 MB)
Resource Guide Download Document (9.05 MB)

Developing primary teacher education students' professional capacities for children's diverse mathematics achievement and learning needs

Sandra Frid, Len Sparrow, Chris Hurst, Lina Pelliccione, Susan Beltman, Diana Van Straalen
Curtin University of Technology
2010
Curtin University of Technology

The aim of this project was to enhance primary teacher education students' capacities as mathematics teachers, catering for children’s diverse achievement and learning needs.  there is a focus teaching Indigenous children and children in regional, rural and remote locations. A series of authentic learning and assessment tasks undertaken by the students are provided on a CD.

Final Report Download Document (382.81 KB)
Resource CD Download Document (20.94 MB)

Learning and Teaching Guide: A handbook to support institutions in implementing programs for assisting the development of communication and life skills in veterinary students

Jennifer Mills, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan, John Baguley
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Handbook Download Document (4.54 MB)

 

This 80-page handbook provides seven lesson plans, four assessment tools, fifteen supporting materials such as marking rubrics, and a bibliography to support training in communication for veterinary care.  The handbook enables a lecturer to teach skills and insights into empathy – essentially emotional intelligence – for professional veterinary practice, with particular attention to the owner-pet bond.

Teaching a professional skills module for veterinary students?  This handbook is meant for you.  If you are trying to teach professional skills in any field, such as engineering, this handbook can reveal useful insights, though the examples provided will not be directly applicable.

The handbook’s lesson plans are presented succinctly.  They include a one-paragraph review of the literature to justify the need for the lesson as well as a list of steps required to complete the activity.  Detailed resources may be found at the back of the handbook.  This format keeps the lesson plan to a single page, presenting it as an outline to help selection and stimulate thought.

The lesson plans are not provided with an estimate of how long each activity can take.  Nor are there strategies for demonstrating to colleagues why one should include each lesson in the curriculum, though one can follow up with the project principals for these insights.

It will take some effort to integrate these communication activities into science-based subjects, for those who have insufficient ‘space’ in their professional skills modules, or who indeed have no such module.  That said, the teaching strategies are well conceived, with lots of student group discussion and background theory to help the lecturer to understand, and relay to the students, key aspects of the nature of humans and their pets.

Those who are familiar with facilitating discussions will find adopting these materials to be easier than those who lack such experience.  If you are not yet comfortable with facilitative teaching, then you might want to have a colleague who specialises in communication at your side during development and implementation of lessons (e.g., someone from psychology or doctor-patient communication training).  Note that some exercises call for people to role-play clients; so check on resources needed before launching into an element of this curriculum. The bottom line – good stuff, but you may need a coach by your side (or on the phone).

Learning in Networks of Knowledge: improving student outcomes using Web 2.0 concepts and a knowledge-networking approach

Professor Matthew Allen
Curtin University
2011
Curtin University

The Learning in Networks of Knowledge (LINK) Project explored and identified Web 2.0 applications and tools that can contributed to innovative and agile teaching and learning approaches centred on knowledge production in a networked environment.  These approaches and a wide range of Web 2.0 applications were tested within an applied research setting in the Department of Internet Studies at Curtin University.  Pedagogical challenges involved the development of authentic learning experiences and assessment tasks, while providing effective cognitive scaffolding within which learning could occur. The project website provides examples, guidance material, publications, tools and resources and should be read with the report.

Final Report Download Document (414.11 KB)

New technologies, new pedagogies: using mobile technologies to develop new ways of teaching and learning

University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Final Report Download Document (5.87 MB)

Physical Assessment: Practical Chest Auscultation

Ron Kerr
Charles Sturt University
2001
Charles Sturt University
This is a report for a 1998 National Teaching Development Grant funded by the Committee for University Teaching and Staff Development. The report details the project's development and outlines ways in which the teaching innovations resulting from the project can be implemented. Reccommendations from the project are listed.
Final report Download Document (24.9 KB)

Quality assessment: linking assessment tasks and teaching outcomes in the social sciences

Jennifer Gore, James Ladwig, Wendy Elsworth, Hywel Ellis, Robert Parkes, Tom Griffiths
The University of Newcastle
2009
The University of Newcastle
Framework Download Document (535.62 KB)

The framework is diagrammatically portrayed as a circle with the elements of the previously developed Assessment characteristics as the inner circle and a range of factors identified as Student Support and Significance as the outer circle. The purpose of the framework is to enable academics to have increased support in assessment task design. It is located in a philosophy of social constructivism, which needs to be recognised by those using the framework and while generalisable, it is likely to be of particular interest to those teaching in the social sciences. The instructions on the use of the guide are clear, which allows for easy navigation. Explanations and definitions are given of each of the elements of the model and suggestions for the improvement of tasks provide assistance for those coming to assessment de novo. There may be some scepticism about the characteristic of meta-language but it is a useful debate to have, given that it is more particular to education than some other social sciences. The material on significance also is embedded in the philosophical approach and it provides important material on understanding what students bring to learning and how this intersects with assessment. This, together with the Student Support material, brings strengths to the model which are often not considered by academics but which are vital to ensure authentic learning. Explicit quality criteria, high expectations and student direction articulate those areas of assessment which frequently are not considered by academics, to the frustration of students. The elaborations and suggestions for academics are a real strength of this model.  The report provides pro forma and samples which add to the value of the resource. 

Quality assessment: linking assessment tasks and teaching outcomes in the social sciences: Final Report

Jennifer Gore, James Ladwig, Wendy Elsworth, Hywel Ellis, Robert Parkes, Tom Griffiths
The University of Newcastle
2009
The University of Newcastle
Final Report Download Document (636.62 KB)

 

The report uses the concept of ‘authentic pedagogy’, which has been developed from earlier work. This purports to measure demonstration of disciplinary depth, depth of analysis, richness of communication and the extent to which problematic nature of knowledge is recognised. The report is dense but well referenced and examines correlation between assessment tasks and standards, as well as providing an ‘audit’ of the quality of assessment tasks. It suggests that it provides explicit criteria which lecturers can use to measure specific achievement in their subject area. The sample size is small and self selected; all are in social sciences, except for the odd inclusion of languages. The results are statistically analysed to ensure validity, although the variance may be questionable. 
The assessment task quality descriptors provide a useful framework for those designing assessment tasks although the meta-language criterion is, in the reviewers view, tied to the philosophical underpinnings and may confuse those unfamiliar with it or provide an issue for those who do not accept this stance. The strength of the report lies in the clarity with which the descriptors and the authentic achievement scales are described and in the examples which are included in the report. The results of the study usefully show that tasks which are intellectually challenging and engaging produce work which is consistent with broad academic standards (although these are not  defined).  The approach using a variety of inputs, including workshops, development of a tertiary assessment practice guide and scoring manual make this a much needed additional resource which could assist in improving assessment in universities in the Social Sciences. Its complexity and less obvious applicability for assessment in the humanities may make it less accessible for some academics.

Remix, mash-up, share: authentic web 2.0 assessment scenarios and criteria for interactive media, games and digital design

Ingrid Richardson
Murdoch University
2013
Murdoch University
Curtin University, University of Canberra
Final report Download Document (2.28 MB)

Rethinking assessment in the participatory digital world – Assessment 2.0

Geoffrey Crisp
The University of Adelaide
2011
The University of Adelaide
Fellowship Report Download Document (2.79 MB)
Handbook Download Document (5.79 MB)
Teachers' Guide Download Document (1.84 MB)
Managers' Guide Download Document (1.54 MB)