Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

19 resources found for ‘first year experience’.

Articulating a transition pedagogy to scaffold and to enhance the first year student learning experience in Australian higher education

Sally Kift
Queensland University of Technology
2009
Queensland University of Technology

This fellowship focussed on the important role of the curriculum in first year transition, success and retention. A research-based 'transition pedagogy' was articulated framed around the identification of six First Year Curriculum Principles that stand out as supportive of first year learning engagement, success. These principles are Transition, Diversity, Design, Engagement, Assessment and Evaluation and monitoring. Several discipline case studies, an extensive engaged dissemination strategy and other resources are available from the fellowship website.

Final Report Download Document (713.31 KB)

This online resource provides practical ideas and strategies for academic and professional practitioners responsible for designing curricula to support first year university students. It advocates for intentional first year curriculum design using six first year curriculum principles: Transition, Diversity, Design, Engagement, Assessment, Evaluation and Monitoring.  The website features resources including a briefing paper on first year assessment and checklists with useful tips for first year teachers, program coordinators and institutional leaders of learning and teaching. It would be particularly useful for academic staff responsible for designing first year curricula across disciplines. Professional staff who support first year curriculum design and delivery in such areas as blended learning will also find this a very useful site. This resource raises awareness of the multidimensional nature of the first year curriculum, drawing attention to the importance of supporting student diversity through the purposeful design of fit-for-purpose learning activities and assessment tasks. As such it would be useful for academic development staff who provide institution-level support to enhance the quality of first year curricula. The focus on evaluation and monitoring is particularly important for its emphasis on the value of continuous review and improvement of first year curricula. Discipline-based case studies are another feature of the resource. Exemplars are drawn from such fields as Law and the Creative Arts, IT and Biology. Kift has sought the input of Australian and international expert commentators who review the case studies and provide input on key issues. This dimension is particularly useful as it provides an indication of the international relevance and appeal of the resource, as well as the rigour of its approach.  In terms of accessibility, the website does not readily emerge from a quick Google search of the internet, so users may want to bookmark the site. Nevertheless, once you arrive, you will find the site relatively easy to navigate and resources readily downloadable using PDF-reading software. One of the challenges you may encounter is that this resource site is embedded within a larger site. If you navigate away from the ‘Transition Pedagogy’ area and follow some of the hyperlinks, it can be a little difficult to find your way back. It is important to be aware of this if you decide to pursue some of the interesting and informative links on the site.

Get Set for Success: Using online self-assessments to motivate first year engineering students to engage in and manage their learning

Lorelle Burton, David Dowling, Majella Albion
University of Technology, Sydney
2014
University of Technology, Sydney

EngCAT is an online educational resource that enables prospective engineering students to self-test their interest and motivation in engineering and make an informed choice about their career path. The EngCAT website can be used for careers advice – helping prospective students better understand their individual learning approaches, how they work in teams, and whether they have the skills and interest to pursue a career in engineering. This enhanced self-awareness will enable students to seek support where needed and better manage their learning to successfully progress through their program. EngCAT is designed to help the engineering industry attract students who have the required skill sets but may not otherwise have considered a career in engineering

The University of Newcastle, The University of Queensland, University of New England, University of Technology, Sydney
Final report Download Document (1.31 MB)

Student and staff expectations and experiences

Russell Brinkworth, Ben McCann, Jacqui McCann
The University of Adelaide
2014
The University of Adelaide
Flinders University, University of South Australia
Final report Download Document (800.57 KB)

Educating the Net Generation - A Handbook of Findings for Practice and Policy

Gregor Kennedy, Barney Dalgarno, Sue Bennett, Kathleen Gray, Jenny Waycott, Terry Judd, Andrea Bishop, Karl Maton, Kerri-Lee Krause, Rosemary Chang
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Handbook Download Document (5.96 MB)

Educating the Net Generation - A Toolkit of Resources for Educators in Australian Universities

Kathleen Gray, Gregor Kennedy, Jenny Waycott, Barney Dalgarno, Sue Bennett, Rosemary Chang, Terry Judd, Andrea Bishop, Karl Maton, Kerri-Lee Krause
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Toolkit Download Document (7.87 MB)

Educating the Net Generation: Implications for Learning and Teaching in Australian Universities

Gregor Kennedy, Kerri-Lee Krause, Karl Maton, Andrea Bishop, Rosemary Chang, Jenny Waycott, Terry Judd, Kathleen Gray, Sue Bennett, Barney Dalgarno
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Final report Download Document (2.06 MB)

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales

Despite its key position as an enabling discipline, physics content in school and university curricula is decreasing at an alarming rate. There is a real need for essential physics principles to be made widely available to an increasingly diverse group of students and academics. The Physclips package provides an excellent resource that specifically fills this critical gap. This is a very visual, engaging and easy to use introductory series into major physics principles. It takes an unashamedly rigorous approach. One of the outstanding features is the links to explain in an integrated manner, the mathematical principles supporting the physics. Other key features are the use of tutorials and animations. There is a very strong pedagogical foundation. For example, the authors have taken into account cognitive load theory, the use of narration to reinforce the animation and current web design approaches to produce this very sophisticated tool. The modules go into a good level of depth and detail and are designed such that they can be done at an individual’s own pace. This resource will be of use to anyone who wants and alternative platform to learn about the basics of physics and can be used either to support physics classes or to provide refresher or learning activities. Potential users include university and later year school students as well as teacher and academics who would like to refresh their knowledge. From a pedagogical perspective, these clips also act as excellent examples of how physics can be taught in an approachable and engaging manner. This is a user friendly interface that loads quickly and is readily navigable. It is also released through Creative Commons so there are no fees associated with its use. The videos require a Flash player. The clips currently cover Mechanics, Waves and Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. It is not clear whether further modules are planned. There are many physics videos and online resources available on the internet, but these Physclips packages are of the highest standard and will retain their relevance for many years to come.

IS-IT learning? Online interdisciplinary scenario-inquiry tasks for active learning in large, first year STEM courses

Lawrence Gahan, Gwen Lawrie
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland
Purdue University (USA)
Final Report Download Document (1.7 MB)
Resource Handbook Download Document (21.32 MB)

A cross-disciplinary approach to language support for first year students in the science disciplines

Felicia Zhang
University of Canberra
2011
University of Canberra
The University of Newcastle, University of Tasmania, University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (391.13 KB)
Survey Instruments Download Document (1.54 MB)
Learning Resources Download Document (1.28 MB)

Transition in, transition out (TiTo): peer mentoring for sustainable development of first and third year psychology students

Andrea Chester, Lorelle Burton, Sophia Xenos, Karen Elgar, Bianca Denny
RMIT University
2013
RMIT University
University of Southern Queensland
Final report Download Document (685.75 KB)
Handbook for student mentees Download Document (202.63 KB)
Handbook for student mentors Download Document (1.12 MB)

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics: Final Report

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (559.07 KB)

Development of dental learning packages for first year into computer assisted learning modules.

Grant C Townsend
The University of Adelaide
1994
The University of Adelaide
This is a final report for a 1994 National Teaching Development Grant funded by the Committee for the Advancement of University Teaching. The report details the project, outlining its major outcomes and achievements, and describes the evaluation process.
Final report Download Document (39.58 KB)

Overcoming algebraic misconceptions that inhibit students’ progress in mathematical sciences

Caroline Bardini, Robyn Pierce
The University of Melbourne
2014
The University of Melbourne
Final Report Download Document (391.63 KB)

Curriculum renewal in engineering through theory-driven evaluation

Lesley Jolly
The University of Queensland
2014
The University of Queensland
Canterbury University (NZ), Charles Darwin University, CQUniversity, Curtin University, Deakin University, Queensland University of Technology, RMIT University, The Australian National University, The University of Melbourne, The University of Western Australia, University of South Australia, University of Southern Queensland
Final report Download Document (1.65 MB)

A threshold concepts focus to curriculum design: supporting student learning through application of variation theory

Gerlese Åkerlind , Jo McKenzie , Mandy Lupton
The Australian National University
2011
The Australian National University
Queensland University of Technology, The University of Sydney, University of Technology, Sydney

Using cost-effective multimedia to create engaging learning experiences in law and other disciplines

Professor Des Butler
Queensland University of Technology
2011
Queensland University of Technology

This fellowship addresses the needs of (1) final year law students studying ethics and (2) law academics and other interested educators in higher education wishing to use ICT to create engaging learning environments for their students but lacking the capacity to do so. A blended learning program was developed including instruction on theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of legal ethics, together with  Entry into Valhalla, an online suite of modules featuring self-test quizzes and machinima scenarios depicting legal dilemmas confronting the members of a fictional law firm.  The project website includes a detailed resources manual and instructional videos.

Fellowship Report Download Document (885.64 KB)

Enhancing the assessment in the Biological Sciences

Professor Kerri-Lee Krause, Dr Kerri-Lee Harris, Ms Robin Garnett, Associate Professor Dawn Gleeson, Associate Professor Mary Peat, Dr Charlotte Taylor
The University of Melbourne
2007
The University of Melbourne

The discipline of biological science encompasses the long standing fields such as zoology, botany and anatomy, along with the more recently defined fields of biochemistry, ecology, genetics, developmental biology and others. Students often take highly general first year programs, later branching into more specialised sub fields. As the number of undergraduate students attracted to science declined steadily in the last decade, there has been a growing concern regarding the qualifications and capacity of teachers, and that of curricula to effectively prepare and enthuse young people for careers in the sciences (Harris et al., 2005). The purpose of this project was to develop and strategically disseminate resources designed to enhance the assessment of learning in the biological sciences in Australian universities. The project involved fieldwork on assessment issues, and studies of current approaches and best practice in eight Australian universities.

Sydney

Teachers need to clearly explain assessment requirements and strategies pertinent to their courses within any discipline area. This excellent resource provokes academics firstly, to reflect upon and question what current methods they use to assess students, and secondly, whether they utilise recognised, up-to-date, principles of effective assessment. For early career academics and academics reviewing the curriculum design and content of their teaching courses this resource provides extensive examples of assessment strategies written by academic staff from across Australia (and supported by students’ feedback). Examples provided can be easily downloaded in PDF format, and provide contact details for academics to network with colleagues and share innovative assessment practices. Whilst the resource is complete in itself, there is an open invitation to all academics, students and stakeholders to contribute.  For example, new academic users can easily download a template and submit their own assessment method to UniServe Science to share with colleagues.   This opportunity permits all users to continually update and add content and ideas to the database and disseminate content to the wider academic community that will maintain the sustainability of the resource over an extended period of time. Professional accreditation bodies and stakeholders can clearly view assessment practices and even provide direct feedback. This resource is most informative for undergraduate students studying subject areas in the biological sciences. Students gain better performances in assessments if they clearly understand why and how they are being assessed. Clear explanations of principles of assessments, the types of assessment students need to confront and, the purposes of employing these modes of assessments, provide the student with a better understanding of assessment processes.  As a likely consequence, the student may more effectively achieve learning tasks and desired learning outcomes. Being very user friendly it is easy to navigate to the various components of content.  Each link can be easily opened and content downloaded and the search link is effective. ‘Biological science’ is used in its broadest sense and so one wonders if biological science should be replaced by ‘life sciences’ – particularly as the content is likely to expand greatly as more users contribute.

Enhancing the assessment of learning in Australian Higher Education: Biological Sciences

Professor Kerri-Lee Krause, Dr Kerri-Lee Harris, Ms Robin Garnett, Associate Professor Dawn Gleeson, Associate Professor Mary Peat, Dr Charlotte Taylor
The University of Melbourne
2007
The University of Melbourne

The discipline of biological science encompasses the long standing fields such as zoology, botany and anatomy, along with the more recently defined fields of biochemistry, ecology, genetics, developmental biology and others. Students often take highly general first year programs, later branching into more specialised sub fields. As the number of undergraduate students attracted to science declined steadily in the last decade, there has been a growing concern regarding the qualifications and capacity of teachers, and that of curricula to effectively prepare and enthuse young people for careers in the sciences (Harris et al., 2005). The purpose of this project was to develop and strategically disseminate resources designed to enhance the assessment of learning in the biological sciences in Australian universities. The project involved fieldwork on assessment issues, and studies of current approaches and best practice in eight Australian universities.

Sydney
Final Report Download Document (281.81 KB)

Building capacity among emerging occupational therapy academic leaders in curriculum renewal and evaluation at UQ and nationally

Sylvia Rodger
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland

The Good Practice Guides serve as a quick reference guide for those undertaking curriculum design, renewal, review, and evaluation activities. Although developed for use within occupational therapy, the key principles described in the Guides have relevance for other health professions and curriculum development and renewal more broadly. Cases accompany many of these Good Practice Guides.

Compilation of all Fellowship Good Practice Guides & Cases Download Document (1.51 MB)
Guide 1: Role of the Curriculum Convenor or Programme Director Download Document (193.78 KB)
Guide 2: Whole of Program Curriculum Design Download Document (262.83 KB)
Guide 3: Principles of Curriculum Renewal and Change Download Document (297.82 KB)
Guide 4: Curriculum Leadership and Occupational Therapy Download Document (335.83 KB)
Guide 5: Developing a Community of Practice to Support Curriculum Reform Download Document (251.53 KB)
Guide 6: Managing Yourself as a Curriculum Leader and Change Agent and Managing Your Team Download Document (416.77 KB)
Guide 7: Developing Your Team’s Curriculum Vision Download Document (291.05 KB)
Guide 8: Developing your Team’s Educational Philosophy Download Document (351.35 KB)
Guide 9: Developing your Occupational Philosophy Download Document (367.86 KB)
Guide 10: Using Social Networking Tools to Support Communities of Practice Download Document (271.71 KB)
Guide 11: Curriculum Drivers in the Occupational Therapy Higher Education Context Download Document (370.3 KB)
Guide 12: Engaging with Stakeholders Download Document (322.39 KB)
Guide 13: Engaging Consumers as Stakeholders in Curriculum Design and Reform Download Document (383.01 KB)
Guide 14: Determining Curriculum Content Download Document (407.76 KB)
Guide 15: Curriculum Sequences from Gateways to Capstones Download Document (327.78 KB)
Guide 16: Transition Curriculum - Important Considerations for First Year Curriculum Download Document (345.51 KB)
Guide 17: Evaluating and Reflecting on the Impact of Curriculum Changes Download Document (390.44 KB)