Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

8 resources found for ‘online feedback’.

Computer aided feedback and assessment system

Martin Freney
University of South Australia
2010
University of South Australia
Final Report Download Document (2.11 MB)

Online Assessment Feedback as an Instument of Reflective Learning Practice in Human Biology

Dr Jan Meyer, Ms G Fyfe, Associate Professor Sue Fyfe, Dr M. Ziman
The University of Western Australia
2008
The University of Western Australia

The project team developed an online assessment system for the improvement of evaluation of Human Biology students’ higher level learning and skill development. The project team sought to address the challenge of teaching large classes, by developing a system which will provide a more sophisticated online dialogue with students and improved individual feedback mechanisms. The assessment system extends the aspects of Human Biology that can be assessed online (including laboratory exercises); provides analytical tools (including sets of exemplars and remedial materials); administers richer, more analytical feedback; and embeds reflective practice and self-performance assessment into the feedback component of the online assessment system. The project team have collaborated with partner institutions who have implemented the online assessment tool, in an effort to share evaluation and feedback and make improvements to the system.

CUT
Final Report 2007 Download Document (453.97 KB)

Learning to teach online: developing high-quality video and text resources to help educators teach online

Simon McIntyre
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (5.4 MB)

Peer review in online and blended learning environments

Jo McKenzie, Nicola Parker
University of Technology, Sydney
2011
University of Technology, Sydney

This project sought to develop, implement and evaluate a scholarly framework, processes and resources for peer review of learning and teaching in online and blended learning environments.  Specific issues relating to online and blended learning environments were identified as well as the need for formative feedback and professional development. Workshop materials, case studies, and an annotated bibliography are among the resources on the project website.

Final Report Download Document (1.03 MB)

Supporting student peer assessment and review in large groupwork projects

Richard Raban, Andrew Litchfield, Keith Willey, Antoine Hermans, Steve Murray, David Davis, Heinz Dreher, Neil Harris, Katherine Wenham
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney

The project’s purpose is to further the educational design and dissemination of an online tool to support and facilitate self-and-peer assessment of individual contributions in large group work projects. The online tool supports group work processes through facilitating self-and-peer assessment by providing quantitative and qualitative feedback, evaluation, reflection and review opportunities.

CUT, Griffith, QUT
Final Report Download Document (684.2 KB)
TeCTRa Installation Guide v3.00.029 Download Document (389.46 KB)
TeCTRa Manual v3.00.029 Download Document (13.93 MB)
TeCTRa Architecture v3.00.029 Download Document (2.32 MB)
TeCTRa Ajax Interface Common Document for v3.00.029 Download Document (260.29 KB)
TeCTRa Ajax Interface Admin Document for v3.00.029 Download Document (405.29 KB)
TeCTRa Ajax Interface Member Document for v3.00.029 Download Document (383.61 KB)
TeCTRa Ajax Interface System Administration Document for v3.00.029 Download Document (285.15 KB)
TeCTRa Useability Survey Download Document (161.8 KB)

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW

The main focus of the resource is group assessment relevant to a range of disciplines, for example media, communication, creative arts and medical disciplines. It includes 13 case studies (of majors from four universities), explores key issues in relation to group assessment, and includes links to the research literature and keynotes by leading authorities in assessment. The resource is useful for academic staff designing units, courses and programs and who may be intending to incorporate group work. The case studies are useful for both design and assessment samples and for benchmarking purposes. Video is used to develop the key issues: a rationale for group assessment; creating and managing groups; group marks; peer assessment; technology; transparency; and feedback. The presence of both staff and student views and experiences in the video material imparts a particular level of credibility to the discussion of issues and principles. Keynote addresses, on policy, design, implementation, evaluation and learning, from leading authorities in assessment principles, and the practice of group and collaborative assessment, are also included. The case studies are of particular interest to course, unit and program designers as well as academic developers and planning and quality staff, while the issues are of interest to all staff grappling with collaborative or group assessment. The videos, for example those in relation to the rationale for team work, may also be of benefit to students. Users should be made aware of the login link to the forum, an issue which may detract from the website's currency. The resource recognises the competing demands on the user's time and the cognitive load requirements though an accessible design template (using three main and four supplementary links), the use of short videos, and the links to the research literature.  The user does not require prior experience, domain-specific knowledge or specific IT requirements to use the resource. The resource deals with the problematic issue of group assessment and solves key issues in a concise and user-friendly way. It is easy to read and navigate and does not need to be read in conjunction with the project report. It is a practical, easy-to-access and use website on group assessment and team work.

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW
Final Report Download Document (188.02 KB)

Linuxgym: A sustainable and easy-to-use automated developmental assessment tool for computer scripting skills

Dr Andrew Solomon, Professor Jenny Edwards, Dr Raymond Lister, Associate Professor Judy Kay, Dr John Shepherd
University of Technology, Sydney
2008
University of Technology, Sydney

The project focuses on the adaptation, further development and dissemination of LinuxGym, a system for improving IT students’ scripting skills through automated developmental assessment and feedback. Linuxgym will be both a desktop application and an online library of clearly categorized questions.

Final Report Download Document (667.67 KB)