Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

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3 resources found for ‘online tutorials’.

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales

Despite its key position as an enabling discipline, physics content in school and university curricula is decreasing at an alarming rate. There is a real need for essential physics principles to be made widely available to an increasingly diverse group of students and academics. The Physclips package provides an excellent resource that specifically fills this critical gap. This is a very visual, engaging and easy to use introductory series into major physics principles. It takes an unashamedly rigorous approach. One of the outstanding features is the links to explain in an integrated manner, the mathematical principles supporting the physics. Other key features are the use of tutorials and animations. There is a very strong pedagogical foundation. For example, the authors have taken into account cognitive load theory, the use of narration to reinforce the animation and current web design approaches to produce this very sophisticated tool. The modules go into a good level of depth and detail and are designed such that they can be done at an individual’s own pace. This resource will be of use to anyone who wants and alternative platform to learn about the basics of physics and can be used either to support physics classes or to provide refresher or learning activities. Potential users include university and later year school students as well as teacher and academics who would like to refresh their knowledge. From a pedagogical perspective, these clips also act as excellent examples of how physics can be taught in an approachable and engaging manner. This is a user friendly interface that loads quickly and is readily navigable. It is also released through Creative Commons so there are no fees associated with its use. The videos require a Flash player. The clips currently cover Mechanics, Waves and Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. It is not clear whether further modules are planned. There are many physics videos and online resources available on the internet, but these Physclips packages are of the highest standard and will retain their relevance for many years to come.

Peer review of online learning and teaching

Denise Wood, Sheila Scutter, Dale Wache
University of South Australia
2011
University of South Australia

The project developed an open-source, web enabled peer review tool (PROTL). The PROTL system incorporates banks of standards-based criteria for use in peer review, explanations of the meaning of these criteria, exemplars, and an underlying database that can record peer review results and make them available for promotion or awards. The project website provides resources such as an online manual, detailed guides, tutorials and features of the PROTL system, case studies and publications.


 

Final Report Download Document (1.51 MB)

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics: Final Report

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (559.07 KB)