Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

87 resources found for ‘practice based research’.

Indigenous teaching and learning at Australian universities: developing research-based exemplars for good practice

Dr Christine Asmar
The University of Melbourne
2011
The University of Melbourne

This Fellowship aimed to provide practitioners in the field of Indigenous teaching with a set of ‘research-based, practical exemplars for good practice’. Fifteen suggested approaches to indigenous teaching are provided on the fellowship website which also includes a comprehensive resources section.

Download Document (941.31 KB)

Higher Degree Research Training Excellence: A Good Practice Framework

Joe Luca, Trish Wolski
Edith Cowan University
2013
Edith Cowan University

A Best Practice Framework to inform and guide Higher Degree by research training excellence in Australia. 

Final Report Download Document (544.95 KB)

Developing a collaborative national postgraduate research program for 22 Australian film schools

Josko Petkovic
Murdoch University
2014
Murdoch University
Flinders University, Griffith University, RMIT University, The University of Melbourne, University of Technology, Sydney
Final report Download Document (3.88 MB)

Dancing Between Diversity and Consistency: Evaluating Assessment in Postgraduate Studies in Dance

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University

The project aims to refine a code of assessment for postgraduate research studies in dance in Australia, encompassing the two primary modes of investigation, written and practice-based theses, their distinctiveness and their potential interplay. The code will facilitate best practice in assessment for higher degree studies in dance and related creative arts’ disciplines.

Deakin, QUT
Final report Download Document (616.97 KB)

The Report on the research project, 'Dancing with Diversity and Consistency: Refining Assessment in Post Graduate Degrees in Dance', provides useful information regarding the research methodology employed in the development of the project’s guidelines, which are articulated through its primary research outcomes: the website and booklet.  In reflecting on the very recent history of dance in tertiary contexts, its ‘fledgling status in postgraduate contexts’, and the research methodologies employed, the report succinctly outlines some of the key formulations around research degrees: the transition from dependence to independence; the question of how to assess embodiment in the context of higher degree research; as well as the variations to approach and methodology encountered throughout the course of the project. The report also looks at the factors that contributed to the project’s success as well as those that impeded progress. The report is generous in its acknowledgement of contributing stakeholders, and candid in reflecting on the variations and/or limitations that manifested throughout the research process, and which are likely to influence future developments in creative arts research. By also acknowledging the temporal and/or dynamic nature of the research undertaken, the researchers leave the way open for discussion, dialogue and the whole question of knowledge throughout the expanded field of dance and choreographic practices in particular, and the creative and performing arts in general.

Dancing Between Diversity and Consistency: Evaluating Assessment in Postgraduate Studies in Dance: Booklet

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University
Deakin, QUT
Booklet Download Document (3.01 MB)

The overall project (website, booklet and report) aims to provide clear guidelines for the assessment and examination of postgraduate research degrees in dance. By extension, the project establishes a flexible yet rigorous framework for supervisors and HDR students, particularly in its discussion of terms such as: practice-based research, practice-led research, practice as research, performance as research, creative practice as research, creative arts research and research through practice. Consequently, whilst the discipline focus is dance, this resource contributes to broader discussions around research, research training, and assessment and examination in the Creative and Performing Arts. In outlining key terms, classifications and shared characteristics, the website promotes the research findings (assessment guidelines) and establishes the fundamental need for research candidates to establish a ‘research design framework’ that rigorously articulates individual research methodology and outlines benchmark indicators for examiners. Importantly, the increasingly overlapping spheres of professional and academic practice are recognised, and whilst understood as particularly characteristic of dance, it is arguable that the nexus between academic and professional practice is one of the distinguishing characteristic of the creative and performing arts disciplines within the university sector. An important discussion encompasses entry pathways for creative and performing artists and particularly the need for professional equivalence for those mature practitioners who have a substantial body of advanced professional practice, or who can demonstrate high artistic attainment. This is in contradistinction to the more conventional academic pathway of less mature practitioners, who in moving directly from first class Honours into a research masters or doctorate, often do so without the benefit of industry or life experience. A consequence of this discussion is the useful distinction between creative doctorates with an exegetical component, the multi-modal thesis, and more traditional, humanities style theses. A paradigm shift is identified whereby ‘practice’ is understood as supplanting the more traditional, scholarly descriptions about its practice, thereby problematising conventional examination and assessment protocols. The booklet covers much of the same terrain as the website – excluding the video excerpts, and database of dance theses - but is understood as a more user-friendly option in some contexts. It adds value to the overall project, and might also be useful as an advocacy tool in some institutional contexts.

Dancing between Diversity and Consistency

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University
Deakin, QUT

The overall project (website, booklet and report) aims to provide clear guidelines for the assessment and examination of postgraduate research degrees in dance. By extension, the project establishes a flexible yet rigorous framework for supervisors and HDR students, particularly in its discussion of terms such as: practice-based research, practice-led research, practice as research, performance as research, creative practice as research, creative arts research  and research through practice. Consequently, whilst the discipline focus is dance, this resource contributes to broader discussions around research, research training, and assessment and examination in the Creative and Performing Arts. In outlining key terms, classifications and shared characteristics, the website promotes the research findings (assessment guidelines) and establishes the fundamental need for research candidates to establish a ‘research design framework’ that rigorously articulates individual research methodology/s and outlines benchmark indicators for examiners. Importantly, the increasingly overlapping spheres of professional and academic practice are recognised, and whilst understood as particularly characteristic of dance, it is arguable that the nexus between academic and professional practice is one of the distinguishing characteristic of the creative and performing arts disciplines within the university sector.  An important discussion encompasses entry pathways for creative and performing artists and particularly the need for professional equivalence for those mature practitioners who have a substantial body of advanced professional practice, or who can demonstrate high artistic attainment. This is in contradistinction to the more conventional academic pathway of less mature practitioners, who in moving directly from first class Honours into a research masters or doctorate, often do so without the benefit of industry or life experience. A consequence of this discussion is the useful distinction between creative doctorates with an exegetical component, the multi-modal thesis, and more traditional, humanities style theses. A paradigm shift is identified whereby ‘practice’ is understood as supplanting the more traditional, scholarly descriptions about its practice, thereby problematising conventional examination and assessment protocols. The website includes several short video excerpts of works created by dance artists and choreographers as part of their postgraduate research, and even more usefully, a database of Australian dance theses, which it proposes to maintain and update. A bibliography is also included in the ‘About’ section. The website details guidelines and protocols around the preparation and submission of HDR theses, making it a one-stop shop for scholars, candidates and examiners undertaking research inquiries through creative practice.

The academic’s and policy-maker’s guides to the teaching-research nexus

Profesor Kerri-Lee Krause, Dr Sophie Arkoudis, Professor Richard James, Ms Ros McCulloch, Ms Claire Jennings, Dr Alison Green
Griffith University
2008
Griffith University
Final Report Download Document (752.08 KB)

Bridging gaps in music teacher education: developing exemplary practice models using peer collaboration

Julie Ballantyne, Scott Harrison, Margaret Barrett, Nita Temmerman
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University
CSU, UQ, UTAS
Final Report Download Document (908.08 KB)

Good Practice Report: Student transition into higher education

Trevor Gale, Stephen Parker
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

This good practice report, commissioned by the ALTC, provides a summative evaluation of useful outcomes and good practices from ALTC projects and fellowships on student transition into higher education. The report contains:

  • a summative evaluation of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from completed ALTC projects and fellowships
  • a literature review of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from national and international research
  • the proposed outcomes and resources for teaching and learning which will be produced by current incomplete ALTC projects and fellowships
  • identifies areas in which further work or development are appropriate.
University of South Australia
ALTC Good Practice Report Download Document (976.92 KB)

Facilitating the integration of evidence based practice into speech pathology curricula: a scoping study to examine the congruence between academic curricula and work based needs

Dr Leanne Togher
The University of Sydney
2009
The University of Sydney
La Trobe, Macquarie, UoN, UQ
Final report Download Document (816.67 KB)

This resource profiles two surveys that sought to elicit the views of a representative sample of academic staff and clinical educators in regards to the integration and application of evidence based practice (EBP) in speech pathology education. The gaps and challenges of incorporating EBP into curricula and clinical education and clearly discussed. The survey was undertaken in 2009 as a component of a project funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

The resource, while focused on speech pathology education, will have broader application for a range of health professions where the challenge of integrating EBP into academic and clinical education is a perennial problem. The results of the survey, while not particularly surprising, are illuminative and identify some of the key issues that educators face in creating a culture where EBP is integral to contemporary practice rather than simply another academic 'subject'.

This resource can be accessed as a pdf document as part of the full report of the ALTC project. The full report also provides an interesting contextual discussion of the issues surrounding speech pathology education and EBP.

The strengths, challenges and recommendations sections of this resource will be valuable to those involved in health professional education.

The resource is succinct (14 pages) and written in plain English. Some of the tables included in the report, although relevant, will take some time to interpret.

The authors correctly identify the limitations of the approach taken in this study, ie potentially valuable student perspectives were not sought, and the surveys were based on self-report rather than observational/behavioural measures. The resource also mentions observation of four case studies but provides only limited discussion or analysis of this aspect of the study. However, the complete case studies are available as part of the full ALTC report, as are the surveys.

Curriculum and pedagogic bases for effectively integrating practice-based experiences

Stephen Billett
Griffith University
2011
Griffith University
Flinders University, James Cook University, La Trobe University, Murdoch University, The University of Newcastle
Final Report Download Document (783.54 KB)
Project Info & Contacts Download Document (894.79 KB)
Forum Booklet Download Document (1.73 MB)
Guidelines for practice: integrating practice-based experiences Download Document (231.26 KB)

Practice-based education: enhancing practice and pedagogy

Joy Higgs
Charles Sturt University
2011
Charles Sturt University
Practice-based education: enhancing practice and pedagogy Download Document (1.39 MB)

Paramedic education: developing depth through networks and evidence-based research

Associate Professor Eileen Willis, Mr Timothy Pointon, Associate Professor Peter O'Meara
Flinders University
2009
Flinders University
CSU, ECU, Monash, QUT, UTAS, VU
Final report Download Document (648.91 KB)

Developing a toolkit and framework to support new postgraduate research supervisors in emerging research areas

Professor Eddie Blass, Professor Santina Bertone
Swinburne University of Technology
2014
Swinburne University of Technology
CQUniversity, Edith Cowan University, University of Southern Queensland, Victoria University
Final report Download Document (631.32 KB)
ebook Download Document (2.1 MB)

Building distributed leadership for effective supervision of creative practice higher research degrees

Jillian Hamilton, Susan Carson, Elizabeth Ellison
Queensland University of Technology
2014
Queensland University of Technology
Auckland University of Technology (NZ), The University of Melbourne, The University of New South Wales, University of Western Sydney
Final report Download Document (3.88 MB)

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW
Final Report Download Document (188.02 KB)

Outcomes and uptake of explicit research skill development across degree programs

John Willison
The University of Adelaide
2014
The University of Adelaide
James Cook University, La Trobe University, Monash University, University of South Australia
Final report Download Document (462.65 KB)

The impact of web-based lecture technologies on current and future practices in learning and teaching

Maree Gosper, David Green, Margot McNeill, Rob Phillips, Greg Preston, Karen Woo
Macquarie University
2008
Macquarie University
Final Report Download Document (3.42 MB)

Engaging with learning: understanding the impact of practice based learning exchange

Jo Barraket, Rose Melville, Sarah Wright, Marcelle Scott, Sarah Richardson, Gemma Carey, Stephen Thornton, Paul Hodge
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
UoN, UQ
Final Report Download Document (561.61 KB)
Partner Report Download Document (452.42 KB)
Teaching Staff Report Download Document (418.11 KB)
Student Report Download Document (374.93 KB)
University Leaders Report Download Document (374.69 KB)

An integrated system for online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) for web-based courses

Craig Engstrom, Peter Hay, Doune Macdonald, Peter Brukner, Karim Khan
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland
The University of British Columbia (Canada), The University of Melbourne
Final Report Download Document (866.97 KB)

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