Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

14 resources found for ‘research design’.

Professional competence standards,learning outcomes and assessment: Designing a valid strategy for nutrition Designing a valid strategy for nutrition and dietetics

Claire Palermo, Sandra Capra, Susan Ash, Eleanor Beck, Helen Truby, Brian Jolly
Monash University
2014
Monash University

A PowerPoint of the resource can be downloaded from the below website

Queensland University of Technology, The University of Queensland
Final report Download Document (644.82 KB)
Resource Download Document (794.61 KB)

Implementing effective learning designs

Leanne Cameron, James Dalziel
Macquarie University
2011
Macquarie University
Australian Catholic University, Charles Darwin University, Edith Cowan University, Griffith University, La Trobe University, University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (1.59 MB)

Teaching, technology and educational design: the architecture of productive learning environments

Peter Goodyear
The University of Sydney
2010
The University of Sydney
Fellowship Report Download Document (482.86 KB)

Dancing Between Diversity and Consistency: Evaluating Assessment in Postgraduate Studies in Dance: Booklet

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University
Deakin, QUT
Booklet Download Document (3.01 MB)

The overall project (website, booklet and report) aims to provide clear guidelines for the assessment and examination of postgraduate research degrees in dance. By extension, the project establishes a flexible yet rigorous framework for supervisors and HDR students, particularly in its discussion of terms such as: practice-based research, practice-led research, practice as research, performance as research, creative practice as research, creative arts research and research through practice. Consequently, whilst the discipline focus is dance, this resource contributes to broader discussions around research, research training, and assessment and examination in the Creative and Performing Arts. In outlining key terms, classifications and shared characteristics, the website promotes the research findings (assessment guidelines) and establishes the fundamental need for research candidates to establish a ‘research design framework’ that rigorously articulates individual research methodology and outlines benchmark indicators for examiners. Importantly, the increasingly overlapping spheres of professional and academic practice are recognised, and whilst understood as particularly characteristic of dance, it is arguable that the nexus between academic and professional practice is one of the distinguishing characteristic of the creative and performing arts disciplines within the university sector. An important discussion encompasses entry pathways for creative and performing artists and particularly the need for professional equivalence for those mature practitioners who have a substantial body of advanced professional practice, or who can demonstrate high artistic attainment. This is in contradistinction to the more conventional academic pathway of less mature practitioners, who in moving directly from first class Honours into a research masters or doctorate, often do so without the benefit of industry or life experience. A consequence of this discussion is the useful distinction between creative doctorates with an exegetical component, the multi-modal thesis, and more traditional, humanities style theses. A paradigm shift is identified whereby ‘practice’ is understood as supplanting the more traditional, scholarly descriptions about its practice, thereby problematising conventional examination and assessment protocols. The booklet covers much of the same terrain as the website – excluding the video excerpts, and database of dance theses - but is understood as a more user-friendly option in some contexts. It adds value to the overall project, and might also be useful as an advocacy tool in some institutional contexts.

Dancing between Diversity and Consistency

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University
Deakin, QUT

The overall project (website, booklet and report) aims to provide clear guidelines for the assessment and examination of postgraduate research degrees in dance. By extension, the project establishes a flexible yet rigorous framework for supervisors and HDR students, particularly in its discussion of terms such as: practice-based research, practice-led research, practice as research, performance as research, creative practice as research, creative arts research  and research through practice. Consequently, whilst the discipline focus is dance, this resource contributes to broader discussions around research, research training, and assessment and examination in the Creative and Performing Arts. In outlining key terms, classifications and shared characteristics, the website promotes the research findings (assessment guidelines) and establishes the fundamental need for research candidates to establish a ‘research design framework’ that rigorously articulates individual research methodology/s and outlines benchmark indicators for examiners. Importantly, the increasingly overlapping spheres of professional and academic practice are recognised, and whilst understood as particularly characteristic of dance, it is arguable that the nexus between academic and professional practice is one of the distinguishing characteristic of the creative and performing arts disciplines within the university sector.  An important discussion encompasses entry pathways for creative and performing artists and particularly the need for professional equivalence for those mature practitioners who have a substantial body of advanced professional practice, or who can demonstrate high artistic attainment. This is in contradistinction to the more conventional academic pathway of less mature practitioners, who in moving directly from first class Honours into a research masters or doctorate, often do so without the benefit of industry or life experience. A consequence of this discussion is the useful distinction between creative doctorates with an exegetical component, the multi-modal thesis, and more traditional, humanities style theses. A paradigm shift is identified whereby ‘practice’ is understood as supplanting the more traditional, scholarly descriptions about its practice, thereby problematising conventional examination and assessment protocols. The website includes several short video excerpts of works created by dance artists and choreographers as part of their postgraduate research, and even more usefully, a database of Australian dance theses, which it proposes to maintain and update. A bibliography is also included in the ‘About’ section. The website details guidelines and protocols around the preparation and submission of HDR theses, making it a one-stop shop for scholars, candidates and examiners undertaking research inquiries through creative practice.

Dancing Between Diversity and Consistency: Evaluating Assessment in Postgraduate Studies in Dance

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University

The project aims to refine a code of assessment for postgraduate research studies in dance in Australia, encompassing the two primary modes of investigation, written and practice-based theses, their distinctiveness and their potential interplay. The code will facilitate best practice in assessment for higher degree studies in dance and related creative arts’ disciplines.

Deakin, QUT
Final report Download Document (616.97 KB)

The Report on the research project, 'Dancing with Diversity and Consistency: Refining Assessment in Post Graduate Degrees in Dance', provides useful information regarding the research methodology employed in the development of the project’s guidelines, which are articulated through its primary research outcomes: the website and booklet.  In reflecting on the very recent history of dance in tertiary contexts, its ‘fledgling status in postgraduate contexts’, and the research methodologies employed, the report succinctly outlines some of the key formulations around research degrees: the transition from dependence to independence; the question of how to assess embodiment in the context of higher degree research; as well as the variations to approach and methodology encountered throughout the course of the project. The report also looks at the factors that contributed to the project’s success as well as those that impeded progress. The report is generous in its acknowledgement of contributing stakeholders, and candid in reflecting on the variations and/or limitations that manifested throughout the research process, and which are likely to influence future developments in creative arts research. By also acknowledging the temporal and/or dynamic nature of the research undertaken, the researchers leave the way open for discussion, dialogue and the whole question of knowledge throughout the expanded field of dance and choreographic practices in particular, and the creative and performing arts in general.

Incorporating student experience and transformative learning into curriculum design and planning of undergraduate theological degrees

Les Ball
Melbourne College of Divinity
2013
Melbourne College of Divinity
Adelaide College of Divinity, Australian & New Zealand Association of Theological Schools (ANZATS), Australian Catholic University, Australian College of Theology, Australian Lutheran College, Avondale College, Brisbane College of Theology, Harvest West Bible College, Moore College, Sydney College of Divinity, Tabor College Inc. (SA), Tabor College Inc. (VIC), University of Otago (NZ), Wesley Institute
Final report Download Document (392.97 KB)

The engineering design journey: needs, concept and reality

David Shallcross, Nicoleta Maynard, Jo Dalvean
The University of Melbourne
2011
The University of Melbourne
Charles Darwin University, Coogee Energy P/L, Curtin University, The University of Queensland, The University of Sydney
Final Report Download Document (2.4 MB)

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW
Final Report Download Document (188.02 KB)

Articulating a transition pedagogy to scaffold and to enhance the first year student learning experience in Australian higher education

Sally Kift
Queensland University of Technology
2009
Queensland University of Technology

This fellowship focussed on the important role of the curriculum in first year transition, success and retention. A research-based 'transition pedagogy' was articulated framed around the identification of six First Year Curriculum Principles that stand out as supportive of first year learning engagement, success. These principles are Transition, Diversity, Design, Engagement, Assessment and Evaluation and monitoring. Several discipline case studies, an extensive engaged dissemination strategy and other resources are available from the fellowship website.

Final Report Download Document (713.31 KB)

This online resource provides practical ideas and strategies for academic and professional practitioners responsible for designing curricula to support first year university students. It advocates for intentional first year curriculum design using six first year curriculum principles: Transition, Diversity, Design, Engagement, Assessment, Evaluation and Monitoring.  The website features resources including a briefing paper on first year assessment and checklists with useful tips for first year teachers, program coordinators and institutional leaders of learning and teaching. It would be particularly useful for academic staff responsible for designing first year curricula across disciplines. Professional staff who support first year curriculum design and delivery in such areas as blended learning will also find this a very useful site. This resource raises awareness of the multidimensional nature of the first year curriculum, drawing attention to the importance of supporting student diversity through the purposeful design of fit-for-purpose learning activities and assessment tasks. As such it would be useful for academic development staff who provide institution-level support to enhance the quality of first year curricula. The focus on evaluation and monitoring is particularly important for its emphasis on the value of continuous review and improvement of first year curricula. Discipline-based case studies are another feature of the resource. Exemplars are drawn from such fields as Law and the Creative Arts, IT and Biology. Kift has sought the input of Australian and international expert commentators who review the case studies and provide input on key issues. This dimension is particularly useful as it provides an indication of the international relevance and appeal of the resource, as well as the rigour of its approach.  In terms of accessibility, the website does not readily emerge from a quick Google search of the internet, so users may want to bookmark the site. Nevertheless, once you arrive, you will find the site relatively easy to navigate and resources readily downloadable using PDF-reading software. One of the challenges you may encounter is that this resource site is embedded within a larger site. If you navigate away from the ‘Transition Pedagogy’ area and follow some of the hyperlinks, it can be a little difficult to find your way back. It is important to be aware of this if you decide to pursue some of the interesting and informative links on the site.

Measuring student experience: relationships between teaching quality instruments (TQI) and course experience questionnaire (CEQ)

Joe Hirschberg, Jenny Lye, Martin Davies, Carol Johnston
The University of Melbourne
2011
The University of Melbourne

Results of course experience questionnaires (CEQ) provide Australian tertiary institutions with valuable information on perceptions of their courses. Institutions also survey their students at subject level. This study aimed to determine the degree to which responses recorded on subject level Teaching Quality Indicators (TQI) are related to the CEQ, and whether TQI responses anticipate subsequent CEQ responses.  This study found that TQIs at different institutions are not designed in a consistent manner and that only a small portion of the CEQ responses could be predicted by these TQI. The research established that course characteristics such as: the level of the degree, the Faculty and Department in which the course was taken, the course description, the industry and duties of those who have found employment after completing their course, all strongly influence the CEQ.

Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), Flinders University, Graduate Careers Australia, University of Tasmania, University of Wollongong
Final report Download Document (1.79 MB)
Resource Download Document (9.27 MB)

Building academic staff capacity for using eSimulations in professional education for experience transfer

Jacob Cybulski, Dale Holt, Stephen Segrave, David O'Brien, Judy Munro, Brian Corbitt, Ross Smith, Martin Dick, Ian Searle, Hossein Zadeh, Pradipta Sarkar, Mike Keppell, Deb Murdoch, Ben Bradley
Deakin University
2010
Deakin University

E-simulations are capable of immersing learners in ‘authentic’ e-learning environments, providing innovative and valid teaching and assessment that is seamlessly interwoven in the process of skill acquisition and experience transfer. The Resource Guide contributes to the development of the capacities required by educational institutions to design, develop, implement, evaluate and research the impacts of e-Simulations. The project website provides additional supporting documents and useful links.

CSU, RMIT
Final Report Download Document (7.68 MB)
Resource Guide Download Document (9.05 MB)

Business education in the 21st century: Examining the antecedents and consequences of student team virtuality

Marie Kavanagh, Leisa Sargent, Donella Caspersz, Natasha Levak
University of Southern Queensland
2012
University of Southern Queensland

This project investigated the need to train students to be able to work effectively in teams, particularly virtual teams. The project was both research-driven and experience-based and considered the concept of ‘virtuality’ in teaching and learning at university. Virtuality for the purpose of this project refered to online collaboration by team members without the constraints of time and the necessity to be in the same place. The project sought to establish how to:

  • design online resources to facilitate implementation of virtual student teams
  • select appropriate technologies to support virtual student team activities
  • provide online training for staff and students to assess readiness
  • enhance the effectiveness of virtual teamwork
  • evaluate virtual student team projects in the Australian business education context.
The University of Melbourne, The University of Western Australia
Final Report Download Document (6.42 MB)

Finding Common Ground: enhancing interaction between domestic and international students

Sophie Arkoudis, Xin Yu, Chi Baik, Shanton Chang, Ian Lang, Kim Watty, Helen Borland, Amande Pearce, Josephine Lang
The University of Melbourne
2010
The University of Melbourne

The Final Report presents an investigation of how peer interaction can be designed and used, within the teaching and learning environment, to engage domestic and international students.  A key outcome was the development of a six-dimensional conceptual frameworkwhich underpins the resources produced for the project.  Potential obstacles to student interaction, from both teaching and learning perspectives, are identified.  A DVD, Finding Common Ground, a student flyer, and background paper are available from the project website.

This guide describes the dimensions of the Interaction for Learning Framework: planning interaction, creating environments for interaction, supporting interaction, engaging with subject knowledge, developing reflexive processes, and fostering communities of learners. The background paper, Finding common ground: Challenges and opportunities for enhancing interaction between domestic and international students, is included in the Guide.

RMIT, VU
Final Report Download Document (1.71 MB)
Finding Common Ground Guide for Academics Download Document (1.52 MB)