Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

12 resources found for ‘work experience’.

Career development learning: maximising the contribution of work integrated learning to the student experience. Final report 2009

Martin Smith, Sally Brooks, Anna Lichtenberg, Peter McIlveen, Peter Torjul, Joanne Tyler
University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Final report and resources
Flinders, Monash, RMIT, USQ
Final report Download Document (1.1 MB)
Career development learning brochure Download Document (836.83 KB)
Career development learning brochure for employers Download Document (820.99 KB)

The WIL (Work Integrated Learning) Report

Carol-Joy Patrick, Dr Deborah Peach, Catherine Pocknee, Fleur Webb, Dr Marty Fletcher, Gabriella Pretto
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University

The aim of this large-scale scoping study of work integrated learning in higher education was to identify issues and map a broad and growing picture of WIL across Australia and to identify ways of improving the student learning experience in relation to WIL. Evidence highlighted the importance of strong partnerships between stakeholders (students, university academic and professional staff, employers, professional associations, and government) in facilitating effective learning outcomes for students. A set of recommendations (Chapter 1) and an implementation framework (Chapter 9) are project outcomes.  Thirty curriculum vignettes, providing a snapshot of a broad range of practices, are available from the website.

QUT
Final Report Download Document (1.23 MB)

A guide to supervision in social work field education

Associate Professor Wendy Bowles, Mr Mike Collingridge, Associate Professor Jennifer McKinnon, Ms Kylie Agllias, Mr Al Dawood, Professor Jude Irwin, Ms Sue Maywald, Professor Carolyn Noble, Ms Justine O’Sullivan, Dr Joanna Zubrzycki
Charles Sturt University
2011
Charles Sturt University

This guide, based on the masters level online program, is designed for those wanting to learn about the theory and practice of supervising social work students during their field education placement. Four topics cover the nature of social work field education, standards and roles, educational foundations, and phases of student supervision.  Questions, exercises and reading reflection segments support the text and other online documents.

Australian Association of Social Workers, Australian Catholic University, Flinders University, NSW Department of Community Services, The University of Newcastle, The University of Sydney, University of Western Sydney, Victoria University
Guide to Supervision Download Document (5.49 MB)

Online student supervision training – accessible and cooperative learning in social work

Associate Professor Wendy Bowles, Mr Mike Collingridge, Associate Professor Jennifer McKinnon, Ms Kylie Agllias, Mr Al Dawood, Professor Jude Irwin, Ms Sue Maywald, Professor Carolyn Noble, Ms Justine O’Sullivan, Dr Joanna Zubrzycki
Charles Sturt University
2011
Charles Sturt University

This project established a national, accessible, online program to prepare practitioners to supervise social work and human services students during their practicum subjects. Resources include a project website linking to the masters level and free online subjects in student supervision, as well as to field education resources. Shared standards for quality student supervision in social work education that balance industry, professional and university requirements were developed.

Australian Association of Social Workers, Australian Catholic University, Flinders University, NSW Department of Community Services, The University of Newcastle, The University of Sydney, University of Western Sydney, Victoria University
Final Report Download Document (1.72 MB)

Using professional standards: Assessing work integrated learning in initial teacher education

Cheryl Sim, Jill Freiberg, Andrea Allard, Simone White, Rosie Le Cornu, Briony Cater
Griffith University
2013
Griffith University
Deakin University, Monash University, University of South Australia
Final report Download Document (454.92 KB)

Online Student Supervision Project

Associate Professor Wendy Bowles, Mr Mike Collingridge, Associate Professor Jennifer McKinnon, Ms Kylie Agllias, Mr Al Dawood, Professor Jude Irwin, Ms Sue Maywald, Professor Carolyn Noble, Ms Justine O’Sullivan, Dr Joanna Zubrzycki
Charles Sturt University
2011
Charles Sturt University
Australian Association of Social Workers, Australian Catholic University, Flinders University, NSW Department of Community Services, The University of Newcastle, The University of Sydney, University of Western Sydney, Victoria University

Managing educational change in the ICT discipline at the tertiary education level: Final Report

Tony Koppi, Fazel Naghdy
University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Monash, QUT
Final Report Download Document (1.17 MB)

This is an outstanding, comprehensive analysis of the state of tertiary ICT education in Australia, including the need for some change and how this should be approached. The report includes extensive survey data from the perspectives of academic staff, recent graduates and (to a lesser extent) employers of ICT graduates. It is noteworthy that these surveys have been conducted across a very representative component of the Australian sector, giving confidence about the broad relevance of the findings.

The report is a "must read" for anyone undertaking a serious review of their ICT curriculum or teaching, and indeed is worth the attention of anyone seeking a good example of such a review, irrespective of discipline. It is particularly illuminating to observe the alignment, of lack thereof, between what is taught at University and what students require in the workforce. Of course, there is an ongoing debate about how tightly Universities should aim for work-ready graduates, but the data in this report from recent ICT graduates are relevant to all tertiary programs in this area.

The report is lengthy, with a wealth of (quantitative and qualitative) data and substantial data analysis. There are nine recommendations, of which three focus on the ICT sector and its perceptions by stakeholders, and six address aspects of the curriculum and teaching; these latter recommendations are most relevant for discipline standards. The report is beautifully written and well-organised, and argues its case convincingly. The reader will benefit from either a short reading or a comprehensive analysis.

Authentic assessment in practice settings: a participatory design approach

Di Bloomfield, Belinda Chambers, Suzanne Egan, James Goulding, Peter Reimann, Fran Waugh, Simone White
The University of Sydney
2013
The University of Sydney
Charles Sturt University, Monash University
Final report Download Document (1.66 MB)

Good Practice Report: Clinical Teaching

Robyn Nash
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

 The Good Practice Reports were commissioned by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Ltd. (ALTC) to provide a summative evaluation of useful outcomes and good practices from ALTC projects and fellowships on key topics in higher education. Each report contains:

  • a summative evaluation of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from completed ALTC projects and fellowships
  • a literature review of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from national and international research
  • the proposed outcomes and resources for teaching and learning which will be produced by current incomplete ALTC projects and fellowships
  • recommendations of areas in which further work or development are appropriate.
ALTC Good Practice Report: Download Document (549.99 KB)

Business education in the 21st century: Examining the antecedents and consequences of student team virtuality

Marie Kavanagh, Leisa Sargent, Donella Caspersz, Natasha Levak
University of Southern Queensland
2012
University of Southern Queensland

This project investigated the need to train students to be able to work effectively in teams, particularly virtual teams. The project was both research-driven and experience-based and considered the concept of ‘virtuality’ in teaching and learning at university. Virtuality for the purpose of this project refered to online collaboration by team members without the constraints of time and the necessity to be in the same place. The project sought to establish how to:

  • design online resources to facilitate implementation of virtual student teams
  • select appropriate technologies to support virtual student team activities
  • provide online training for staff and students to assess readiness
  • enhance the effectiveness of virtual teamwork
  • evaluate virtual student team projects in the Australian business education context.
The University of Melbourne, The University of Western Australia
Final Report Download Document (6.42 MB)

Get Set for Success: Using online self-assessments to motivate first year engineering students to engage in and manage their learning

Lorelle Burton, David Dowling, Majella Albion
University of Technology, Sydney
2014
University of Technology, Sydney

EngCAT is an online educational resource that enables prospective engineering students to self-test their interest and motivation in engineering and make an informed choice about their career path. The EngCAT website can be used for careers advice – helping prospective students better understand their individual learning approaches, how they work in teams, and whether they have the skills and interest to pursue a career in engineering. This enhanced self-awareness will enable students to seek support where needed and better manage their learning to successfully progress through their program. EngCAT is designed to help the engineering industry attract students who have the required skill sets but may not otherwise have considered a career in engineering

The University of Newcastle, The University of Queensland, University of New England, University of Technology, Sydney
Final report Download Document (1.31 MB)

Developing cross-disciplinary leadership capacity for enhancing the professional education of multidisciplinary mental health workers

Shirley Morrissey, Graham Davidson
Griffith University
2011
Griffith University

This project and resources support a distributed leadership approach to cross-disciplinary education and training for mental health practitioners who will take up multidisciplinary mental health placements.  Resources provided:

  • Multimedia (video) accounts of multidisciplinary mental health practice are available from the website inlcuding materials focusing on the philosophy, ontology, epistemology and methods of the five major mental health disciplines of mental health nursing, occupational therapy, psychiatry, psychology and social work, and multimedia examples of sufferers’ experiences of mental health services.
  • Student placement preparation workshop workbook materials
  • Student placement workbook materials. 
  • Workbooks and accompanying PowerPoint slides for facilitators
  • Annotated bibliography
  • Links to Codes of Ethics websites.
University of Sunshine Coast
Final Report Download Document (710.25 KB)
Workshop Facilitators Manual Download Document (2.06 MB)
Workshop PowerPoint Slides Download Document (3 MB)
Student Placement Preparation Download Document (1.08 MB)
Student Placement Workbook Download Document (592.11 KB)
Annotated Bibliography Download Document (572.8 KB)
Codes of Ethics Download Document (27.24 KB)