Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

25 resources found.

Academic leadership for succession: research and implementation across the arts, social sciences and humanities in Australia

Liz Allen, Tempe Archer, Toni Makkai
University of Canberra
2013
University of Canberra
The Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (DASSH)
Final Report Download Document (969.92 KB)

Changing the culture of teaching and learning in ICT and engineering: facilitating research professors to be teaching and learning leaders

Sylvia Edwards, Bhuva Narayan, Judithe Sheard, Peter O’Shea, Wayne Brookes
Queensland University of Technology
2012
Queensland University of Technology
Monash University, University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (1.31 MB)

createED Strengthening learning and teaching leadership in the creative arts

Barbara de la Harpe, Thembi Mason
RMIT University
2014
RMIT University
Charles Sturt University, CQUniversity, Curtin University, Queensland University of Technology, The University of New South Wales, The University of Newcastle, University of Tasmania
Final report Download Document (10.5 MB)
Evaluation Download Document (126.96 KB)
Viability Case Studies Download Document (1.73 MB)
Case Study Download Document (1.86 MB)

Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods to Enhance Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ

 

This website provides information, links, and resources about how to teach communication and professional skills to veterinary students.  The web pages offer a description of the ALTC project, the opportunity to download outputs such as a workbook, and contact information for key individuals who were involved in the project.

If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the resources provided will be helpful.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case for the value of this material to veterinary students.

It is evident that the authors have engaged someone in developing these materials who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  The case studies, scenarios, role plays, and suggested discussion topics – offered in the downloadable workbook – have the ring of truth to them.  Background discussion from the project report (and, to some extent, the workbook) cites relevant literature on practitioner-client communication.  Also, evidence is provided documenting the impact of these learning activities on students.

If you are not teaching veterinary students and you are a lateral thinker, you could adapt the materials presented here for another discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided would be for students in engineering, for example.

In initially using these materials, it would be handy to have a communication specialist looking over your shoulder.  No matter how comprehensive the explanation of learning activities is, you may not ‘hit the mark’ unless you are already familiar with the style of teaching that is required and be comfortable with the issues that may arise in the guided discussions.

Note that not everything on the website will prove to be useful.  The collection of materials, from workbook to conference posters, seems extensive, but it is also eclectic - a bit of a grab bag.  Head straight for the Handbook for useful information.  Turn to the Project Report for more in depth information on how the materials faired in tests with students.

Developing a culture of peer review of teaching through a distributive leadership approach

Robyn Nash, Alan Barnard
Queensland University of Technology
2014
Queensland University of Technology
Curtin University, The University of Adelaide, University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (1.03 MB)

Embedding and sustaining leadership development for course coordinators through tailored support during curriculum review

Robyn Lines, Neil Trivett, Natalie Brown, Kristin Warr, Jason Flello, Peter Kandlbinder, Jo McKenzie
University of Tasmania
2011
University of Tasmania
University of Ballarat, University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (1.32 MB)
Evaluation Report Download Document (1.32 MB)

Enhancing Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students: Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Final report Download Document (218.38 KB)

This 25-page report details how the project team developed communication skills resources for those who teach professional skills modules for veterinary students.  If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the Workbook that this team produced will be of the most help, and this report can give you additional confidence in using it.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case in this report for the value of the material to veterinary students.  It is evident that the authors have engaged someone who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  There is discussion of the theory of emotional intelligence and similar factors that one must understand to address deficits in student training that the report identifies in the literature and in surveys of students.  It is interesting to read about what their surveys found to be challenging in client consultations by male students but not as challenging by female students, and vice versa.    Evidence is provided documenting the impact of the learning activities developed in this project on students, and that should provide you with confidence and rationale for employing these materials, as alluded to above.  If you are not teaching veterinary students, and you are a lateral thinker, you could read into the efforts documented here how to create materials for your own discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided could be in creating teaching strategies to use with students in engineering, for example.  If you would like to understand the study results in depth, it would be handy to have a communication specialist to consult.   Note that not everything in this report will prove to be useful.  There is a collection of research outcomes and theoretical justifications that could be handy as background information, but they are not essential for employing the actual teaching materials, which are in the Workbook.

Ideas of leadership underpinning proposals to the Carrick Institute

Professor Don Anderson, Professor Richard Johnson
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2006
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
A review of proposals Download Document (62.34 KB)

Leadership for Future Generations: A National Network for University Languages

John Hajek, Colin Nettelbeck, Anya Woods
The University of Melbourne
2013
The University of Melbourne
Monash University, RMIT University, The University of Adelaide, University of Wollongong
Final Report Download Document (6.53 MB)

Leadership for implementing improvements in the learning and teaching quality cycle

Loraine Bennett, Christine Tasker, Joy Whitton
Monash University
2008
Monash University
Final Report Download Document (3.03 MB)

Leadership in Indigenous research capacity building

Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Maggie Walter
Queensland University of Technology
2011
Queensland University of Technology

Implementing and embedding an Indigenous research methodologies master class module

University of Tasmania
Final Report Download Document (1.47 MB)

Leading Excellence – application of the Engaging Leadership Framework (ELF) to new higher education sites and contexts

Lorraine Bennett, Kay Hempsall
Monash University
2010
Monash University

The Engaging Leadership Framework tool and artefacts were developed to support the effective leadership of change and to build leadership capacity in institutions. The report notes that the framework’s value was particularly evident when leadership projects were linked to active learning and the authentic issues of the participants. Artefacts include workshop activities, site case studies, journal notes and reflections, planning and evaluation templates, and ELF game prototypes.

ECU, UB, UNE
Final Report Download Document (37.82 MB)

Leading Fieldwork: Academic leadership for fieldwork coordinators

Sue Jones, Richard Ladyshewsky, Megan Smith, Franziska Trede, Helen Flavell, Rose Chapman
Curtin University
2013
Curtin University
Christian Heritage College
Final Report Download Document (3.99 MB)
Facilitators Guide Download Document (1.5 MB)

Leading for effective partnering in clinical contexts

Professor Debra Creedy, Professor Amanda Henderson
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University
Final Report Download Document (1.31 MB)

Learning without borders: linking development of transnational leadership roles to international and cross-cultural teaching excellence

Margaret Mazzolini, Shelley Yeo, Peter Ling, David Hall
Swinburne University of Technology
2012
Swinburne University of Technology
Curtin University
Final Report Download Document (511.82 KB)

Production of a prototype online leadership learning tool and system for Australia’s universities

Professor Geoff Scott, Hamish Coates, Michelle Anderson
University of Western Sydney
2010
University of Western Sydney

This project provides a university-specific option for systematically and proactively addressing the leadership succession crisis faced by Australian and international universities. It shows how the active, situated, experiential, 'just-in-time' and 'just-for-me' approaches to learning, development and support (known to optimise university student engagement and retention), can be applied to the selection and support if its leaders. The Online Leadership Learning System (OLLS) allows access to practical strategies which experienced leaders in different roles have found helped them to perform effectively.

Final Report Download Document (231.3 KB)

Social, communicative and interpersonal leadership in the context of peer review

Judyth Sachs, Mitch Parsell
Macquarie University
2013
Macquarie University
La Trobe University, Lund University (Sweden), The University of Pretoria
Final Report Download Document (741.11 KB)

Supporting Career Progression Through Academic Mentorship (STREAM)

Elizabeth Halcomb
University of Western Sydney
2014
University of Western Sydney
University of Technology, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (1.01 MB)

Supporting student transition to a futures-orientated professional identity

Ieva Stupans
University of New England
2013
University of New England
Final report Download Document (451.97 KB)

Teaching and Learning: The Role Played by Academic Boards

Tricia Vilkinas, Margaret Peters
University of South Australia
2012
University of South Australia
Final report Download Document (2.27 MB)

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