Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

27 resources found.

Building capacity among emerging occupational therapy academic leaders in curriculum renewal and evaluation at UQ and nationally

Sylvia Rodger
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland

The Good Practice Guides serve as a quick reference guide for those undertaking curriculum design, renewal, review, and evaluation activities. Although developed for use within occupational therapy, the key principles described in the Guides have relevance for other health professions and curriculum development and renewal more broadly. Cases accompany many of these Good Practice Guides.

Compilation of all Fellowship Good Practice Guides & Cases Download Document (1.51 MB)
Guide 1: Role of the Curriculum Convenor or Programme Director Download Document (193.78 KB)
Guide 2: Whole of Program Curriculum Design Download Document (262.83 KB)
Guide 3: Principles of Curriculum Renewal and Change Download Document (297.82 KB)
Guide 4: Curriculum Leadership and Occupational Therapy Download Document (335.83 KB)
Guide 5: Developing a Community of Practice to Support Curriculum Reform Download Document (251.53 KB)
Guide 6: Managing Yourself as a Curriculum Leader and Change Agent and Managing Your Team Download Document (416.77 KB)
Guide 7: Developing Your Team’s Curriculum Vision Download Document (291.05 KB)
Guide 8: Developing your Team’s Educational Philosophy Download Document (351.35 KB)
Guide 9: Developing your Occupational Philosophy Download Document (367.86 KB)
Guide 10: Using Social Networking Tools to Support Communities of Practice Download Document (271.71 KB)
Guide 11: Curriculum Drivers in the Occupational Therapy Higher Education Context Download Document (370.3 KB)
Guide 12: Engaging with Stakeholders Download Document (322.39 KB)
Guide 13: Engaging Consumers as Stakeholders in Curriculum Design and Reform Download Document (383.01 KB)
Guide 14: Determining Curriculum Content Download Document (407.76 KB)
Guide 15: Curriculum Sequences from Gateways to Capstones Download Document (327.78 KB)
Guide 16: Transition Curriculum - Important Considerations for First Year Curriculum Download Document (345.51 KB)
Guide 17: Evaluating and Reflecting on the Impact of Curriculum Changes Download Document (390.44 KB)

Enhancing student learning in the workplace through developing the leadership capabilities of clinical supervisors in the nursing discipline

Professor Robyn Nash, Dr Sandy Sacre, Ms Jennifer Lock, Mr David Ross
Queensland University of Technology
2011
Queensland University of Technology

This project aimed to build the leadership capacity of clinical supervisors in the nursing discipline by developing, implementing and systematically embedding a leadership model in the structure and practice of student supervision. The Leadership in Clinical Education (LaCE) program consisted of two structured workshops complemented by individual personal development projects undertaken by participants. A website providing access to a wide variety of information and other learning resources was developed.

Final Report Download Document (1.49 MB)

Developing a Model for Interprofessional Education during Clinical Placements for Medical and Nursing Undergraduate Students

Professor Amanda Henderson, Dr Heather Alexander
Griffith University
2011
Griffith University
Fellowship Final Report Download Document (2.84 MB)
Student Workbook Download Document (578.66 KB)
Facilitator Notes Download Document (219.94 KB)

Development of a computer-generated digital patient for teaching and assessment in pharmacy

David Newby, Jesse Jin, Peter Summons, Rukshan Athauda, Mira Park, Jennifer Schneider, Sheree Kable, Jennifer Marriott, Gregory Duncan, Maree Simpson, Richard Xu
The University of Newcastle
2011
The University of Newcastle

The project team developed and tested a computer-generated virtual patient for pharmacy students to practise and improve their communication, diagnostic and management skills for minor illnesses.  The software developed allows interaction between the student and the simulated patient, and captures and analyses aspects of the interaction including the questions asked, the diagnosis and management chosen by the student. Feedback is provided to the student.

To obtain the software developed by the project, request a username and password from david.newby@newcastle.edu.au  and then visit http://resweb.newcastle.edu.au/VirtualPatient/private/uploads.

Charles Sturt University, Monash University
Final Report Download Document (2.25 MB)

A programmatic approach to developing writing embedded in nursing courses

Dr Roger Moni
Griffith University
2011
Griffith University

Research to discover the ways in which writing is taught and assessed in the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program at Griffith University, and more widely in Australia and New Zealand, was undertaken in this Fellowship.  Models which best describe and guide the teaching and assessment of writing in the BN program were identified and ways of capacity development of staff, to more effectively teach and assess writing, were explored.

Fellowship Report Download Document (2.57 MB)

An integrated system for online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) for web-based courses

Craig Engstrom, Peter Hay, Doune Macdonald, Peter Brukner, Karim Khan
The University of Queensland
2011
The University of Queensland
The University of British Columbia (Canada), The University of Melbourne
Final Report Download Document (866.97 KB)

Good Practice Report: Clinical Teaching

Robyn Nash
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2011
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

 The Good Practice Reports were commissioned by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Ltd. (ALTC) to provide a summative evaluation of useful outcomes and good practices from ALTC projects and fellowships on key topics in higher education. Each report contains:

  • a summative evaluation of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from completed ALTC projects and fellowships
  • a literature review of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from national and international research
  • the proposed outcomes and resources for teaching and learning which will be produced by current incomplete ALTC projects and fellowships
  • recommendations of areas in which further work or development are appropriate.
ALTC Good Practice Report: Download Document (549.99 KB)

Health, Medicine and Veterinary Science Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement

Maree O'Keefe, Amanda Henderson, Rachael Pitt
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited
2010
Australian Learning and Teaching Council Limited

Academic threshold learning outcomes common across healthcare at professional entry-level bachelor degrees. These standards were developed as part of a demonstration project funded by the Australian Government in 2010 and facilitated by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. Academic institutions and teachers, professional bodies, accreditation bodies, employers and graduates participated in the development of minimum threshold learning outcomes for the discipline.

ISBN: 978-1-921856-30-3

Health, Medicine and Veterinary LTAS Statement v2 Download Document (1.44 MB)

The development of a pre-registration nursing competencies assessment tool for use in universities across Australia

Patrick Crookes, Roy Brown
University of Wollongong
2010
University of Wollongong
CUT, QUT, UniSA, UTS
Final Report Download Document (10.42 MB)

The development of a pre-registration nursing competencies assessment tool for use in universities across Australia: Toolkit

Patrick Crookes, Roy Brown
University of Wollongong
2010
University of Wollongong
CUT, QUT, UniSA, UTS
Toolkit Download Document (1.8 MB)

Ensuring quality graduates of pharmacology: Final Investigation Report

Anna-Marie Babey, Shane Bullock, Elizabeth Davis, Joanne Favaloro, Lynette Fernandes, Tina Hinton, Hilary Lloyd, Ian Musgrave, James Ziogas
The University of Melbourne
2010
The University of Melbourne
Adelaide, JCU, Monash, RMIT, Sydney, UWA
Final Report Download Document (932.14 KB)

This project report addresses the important issue of the consistency and quality of Pharmacology teaching across institutions in Australia.  It is, in effect, a comprehensive scoping exercise carried out in 2008. Importantly, it draws on information from students, academics and industry stakeholders. The project also involved a number of workshops integrated with the pharmacological society interest groups. The data obtained provides for a strong foundation for future curriculum development. Another important outcome is the formation of an education network within the discipline to provide a platform for ongoing curriculum renewal.

This is a well-written, clearly presented stand-alone resource that is an excellent exemplar of how such scoping activities should be conducted. The survey covers different cohorts of students in the science and health sciences area who have to learn pharmacological principles. The survey instrument is appended to the report and, as such, provides a very useful template for others to adapt. It would be of significant use and interest to a broad range of other discipline-based initiatives that are planning such a comprehensive benchmarking exercise. In particular, this report would be of considerable value to other disciplines who engage in service teaching of standard content to diverse student cohorts.

One of the more interesting findings relate to the data around the student's preferred teaching/learning methods. This information has implications that may well extend beyond the health sciences. Future developments from this project should be accessible through the newly-formed Australian Pharmacology and Therapeutics Education Network (APTEN).

Learning and Teaching Guide: A handbook to support institutions in implementing programs for assisting the development of communication and life skills in veterinary students

Jennifer Mills, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan, John Baguley
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Handbook Download Document (4.54 MB)

 

This 80-page handbook provides seven lesson plans, four assessment tools, fifteen supporting materials such as marking rubrics, and a bibliography to support training in communication for veterinary care.  The handbook enables a lecturer to teach skills and insights into empathy – essentially emotional intelligence – for professional veterinary practice, with particular attention to the owner-pet bond.

Teaching a professional skills module for veterinary students?  This handbook is meant for you.  If you are trying to teach professional skills in any field, such as engineering, this handbook can reveal useful insights, though the examples provided will not be directly applicable.

The handbook’s lesson plans are presented succinctly.  They include a one-paragraph review of the literature to justify the need for the lesson as well as a list of steps required to complete the activity.  Detailed resources may be found at the back of the handbook.  This format keeps the lesson plan to a single page, presenting it as an outline to help selection and stimulate thought.

The lesson plans are not provided with an estimate of how long each activity can take.  Nor are there strategies for demonstrating to colleagues why one should include each lesson in the curriculum, though one can follow up with the project principals for these insights.

It will take some effort to integrate these communication activities into science-based subjects, for those who have insufficient ‘space’ in their professional skills modules, or who indeed have no such module.  That said, the teaching strategies are well conceived, with lots of student group discussion and background theory to help the lecturer to understand, and relay to the students, key aspects of the nature of humans and their pets.

Those who are familiar with facilitating discussions will find adopting these materials to be easier than those who lack such experience.  If you are not yet comfortable with facilitative teaching, then you might want to have a colleague who specialises in communication at your side during development and implementation of lessons (e.g., someone from psychology or doctor-patient communication training).  Note that some exercises call for people to role-play clients; so check on resources needed before launching into an element of this curriculum. The bottom line – good stuff, but you may need a coach by your side (or on the phone).

Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods to Enhance Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ

 

This website provides information, links, and resources about how to teach communication and professional skills to veterinary students.  The web pages offer a description of the ALTC project, the opportunity to download outputs such as a workbook, and contact information for key individuals who were involved in the project.

If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the resources provided will be helpful.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case for the value of this material to veterinary students.

It is evident that the authors have engaged someone in developing these materials who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  The case studies, scenarios, role plays, and suggested discussion topics – offered in the downloadable workbook – have the ring of truth to them.  Background discussion from the project report (and, to some extent, the workbook) cites relevant literature on practitioner-client communication.  Also, evidence is provided documenting the impact of these learning activities on students.

If you are not teaching veterinary students and you are a lateral thinker, you could adapt the materials presented here for another discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided would be for students in engineering, for example.

In initially using these materials, it would be handy to have a communication specialist looking over your shoulder.  No matter how comprehensive the explanation of learning activities is, you may not ‘hit the mark’ unless you are already familiar with the style of teaching that is required and be comfortable with the issues that may arise in the guided discussions.

Note that not everything on the website will prove to be useful.  The collection of materials, from workbook to conference posters, seems extensive, but it is also eclectic - a bit of a grab bag.  Head straight for the Handbook for useful information.  Turn to the Project Report for more in depth information on how the materials faired in tests with students.

Virtual microscopy for enhancing learning and teaching

Rakesh Kumar, Gary Velan, Patrick de Permentier, Paul Adam, Stephen Bonser, Michael Beal
The University of New South Wales
2009
The University of New South Wales
Final report Download Document (1.88 MB)

Leading for effective partnering in clinical contexts

Professor Debra Creedy, Professor Amanda Henderson
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University
Final Report Download Document (1.31 MB)

Application of a clinical staff development model (Teaching on the Run) to allied health and multi-professional audiences and to rural and remote settings

Fiona Lake, Margaret Potter, Derrick Webley, Chris Norman
The University of Western Australia
2009
The University of Western Australia
CUT, UQ
Fellowship Report Download Document (656.17 KB)

Enhancing Communication and Life Skills in Veterinary Students: Curriculum Development and Assessment of Methods

Jennifer Mills, John Baguley, Glen Coleman, Michael Meehan
Murdoch University
2009
Murdoch University
Sydney, UQ
Final report Download Document (218.38 KB)

This 25-page report details how the project team developed communication skills resources for those who teach professional skills modules for veterinary students.  If you are teaching veterinary students, either as a core lecturer or someone contributing to a module on professional skills, the Workbook that this team produced will be of the most help, and this report can give you additional confidence in using it.  The core team, who are from three universities, make a compelling case in this report for the value of the material to veterinary students.  It is evident that the authors have engaged someone who has a strong understanding of human communication and how to cultivate empathy with a client.  There is discussion of the theory of emotional intelligence and similar factors that one must understand to address deficits in student training that the report identifies in the literature and in surveys of students.  It is interesting to read about what their surveys found to be challenging in client consultations by male students but not as challenging by female students, and vice versa.    Evidence is provided documenting the impact of the learning activities developed in this project on students, and that should provide you with confidence and rationale for employing these materials, as alluded to above.  If you are not teaching veterinary students, and you are a lateral thinker, you could read into the efforts documented here how to create materials for your own discipline.  I was considering how useful some of the insights provided could be in creating teaching strategies to use with students in engineering, for example.  If you would like to understand the study results in depth, it would be handy to have a communication specialist to consult.   Note that not everything in this report will prove to be useful.  There is a collection of research outcomes and theoretical justifications that could be handy as background information, but they are not essential for employing the actual teaching materials, which are in the Workbook.

Paramedic education: developing depth through networks and evidence-based research

Associate Professor Eileen Willis, Mr Timothy Pointon, Associate Professor Peter O'Meara
Flinders University
2009
Flinders University
CSU, ECU, Monash, QUT, UTAS, VU
Final report Download Document (648.91 KB)

Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice (APP)

Megan Dalton, Jennifer Keating, Megan Davidson
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University

A preliminary search of the physiotherapy literature revealed a lack of systematic studies to determine the validity and reliability of instruments for assessing clinical competence of students in physiotherapy programs worldwide (Beckman et al. 2005; Stickley 2005). The project group therefore proposes a method for the development of a standardised assessment procedure that meets the needs of students and educators and provides valid and reliable measurements of student clinical competence.

Specific project aims were to:

  1. develop a competency based assessment instrument to evaluate the performance of physiotherapy students in the workplace;
  2. investigate and refine the psychometric properties of the instrument; and
  3. investigate the viability of using the instrument as a measure of physiotherapy competency in the practice environment

La Trobe, Monash
Final report Download Document (5.22 MB)

The Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice instrument (APP) is a standardised clinical assessment tool with rigorous field testing behind its development.  The APP has been endorsed by the Council of Physiotherapy Deans of Australia and New Zealand (CPDANZ) which has strongly recommended its use in university entry level programs in Australasia. The APP is listed as a validated tool for the assessment of student clinical competence by the Australian Physiotherapy Council in its Accreditation of Entry Level Physiotherapy Programs -- A Manual for Universities. The APP is now used in the majority of accredited entry level physiotherapy programs throughout Australasia.

The resource comprises the Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice Clinical Education Resource Manual and a DVD. The Resource Manual contains a comprehensive description of the APP instrument including desirable professional behaviours and practical performance targets which make up the performance indicators for each of the 20 items as well as detailed guidance for scoring of each item.

The DVD cannot be used as a stand-alone resource. It is provided to support clinical educators in applying the APP and/or for training in assessment using the APP. Prior to viewing the DVD therefore, users will need to familiarise themselves with the APP instrument and its associated performance indicators, as well as how best to use the case studies provided on the DVD.

The resource will be of great value to academics involved in preclinical and clinical education of physiotherapy students, to clinical educators and preceptors in the field and indeed to students themselves as a self-directed learning tool. Because of its standardisation and wide adoption in Australasia, there is a great potential for the APP to be used for benchmarking purposes and for comparison of assessment outcomes in physiotherapy programs which may be quite varied in their design and delivery.

Facilitating the integration of evidence based practice into speech pathology curricula: a scoping study to examine the congruence between academic curricula and work based needs

Dr Leanne Togher
The University of Sydney
2009
The University of Sydney
La Trobe, Macquarie, UoN, UQ
Final report Download Document (816.67 KB)

This resource profiles two surveys that sought to elicit the views of a representative sample of academic staff and clinical educators in regards to the integration and application of evidence based practice (EBP) in speech pathology education. The gaps and challenges of incorporating EBP into curricula and clinical education and clearly discussed. The survey was undertaken in 2009 as a component of a project funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

The resource, while focused on speech pathology education, will have broader application for a range of health professions where the challenge of integrating EBP into academic and clinical education is a perennial problem. The results of the survey, while not particularly surprising, are illuminative and identify some of the key issues that educators face in creating a culture where EBP is integral to contemporary practice rather than simply another academic 'subject'.

This resource can be accessed as a pdf document as part of the full report of the ALTC project. The full report also provides an interesting contextual discussion of the issues surrounding speech pathology education and EBP.

The strengths, challenges and recommendations sections of this resource will be valuable to those involved in health professional education.

The resource is succinct (14 pages) and written in plain English. Some of the tables included in the report, although relevant, will take some time to interpret.

The authors correctly identify the limitations of the approach taken in this study, ie potentially valuable student perspectives were not sought, and the surveys were based on self-report rather than observational/behavioural measures. The resource also mentions observation of four case studies but provides only limited discussion or analysis of this aspect of the study. However, the complete case studies are available as part of the full ALTC report, as are the surveys.

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