Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

41 resources found.

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies: Quality Criteria

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Quality Criteria Download Document (525.49 KB)

 

This document is one of a suite of resources from a project focused on developing appropriate evaluation quality criteria for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary doctoral research for use by students, supervisors and others. The goal was to provide a frame that is consistent across different discipline areas, as different disciplines judge quality in different ways, but specifically addressing implications for transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research. 

This resource provides the identified quality criteria for evaluating transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research theses. It provides analyses of: the nature of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research; difficulties associated with judging its quality; pedagogy in the area; and a literature review on the topic. It culminates in a set of criteria developed through the project and literature-based analyses. The criteria also emerge from practice and workshop discussions involving experienced transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary supervisors. 

This resource is therefore an informative document on these areas for the practice of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research study and supervision as well as for those conducting research in the area. Readers may want to read the whole document for the coverage of issues in the field. Alternatively, for practical purposes, they can turn to the seven identified generic criteria of research quality on pages 17 and 18 and summary of interpretations for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research. However, the discussion of the generic quality criteria and application for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research provided on pages 7-16 is very readable and well-worth reading to gain understanding of the final summary. 

The resource is valuable for supervisors and students engaging in transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research. It could also be used by Thesis Examination Offices in higher education institutions in Australia and internationally in order to reflect on the appropriateness of current thesis examination procedures and criteria for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research examinations and identification of suitable examiners. 

The title of this work shows a focus on doctoral research students and supervision. However, the materials could be modified to suit transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research outcomes for any level of higher education, undergraduate or postgraduate.

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies: Workshop Resources

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Workshop Resources Download Document (434.24 KB)

 

This document is one of the outcomes resulting from a project focused on developing high quality outcomes and quality evaluation processes in transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research for use by students and supervisors. 

The project resulted in several outcomes that can be used together or independently including: a summary report; identification of quality criteria; a toolbox of ideas for practice. This resource provides workshop materials that can be used by supervisors or supervisor trainers (at any level) to develop improved understanding and practices in transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research supervision. A companion resource provides a PowerPoint presentation that can be used with the workshop material. 

This resource includes a number of Word files containing worksheets that can be printed for use. The files include: a Presenter’s outline, including timing and a running sheet, and expected learning outcomes; Discussion Guides/Worksheets for participants; and a Feedback and Evaluation Form. 

The workshop requires participants to have undertaken an hour of preparation with the two key outcome documents from the project, the quality criteria document and the ideas for good practice document. These documents therefore also need to be provided to participants prior to a workshop. The workshop template provides guidance on the questions and discussion points that engage participants with the outcomes documents as student supervision. It provides guidance for reflection, group discussions, and effective sharing of ideas. 

These materials are very usable and draw on the substantial outcomes of the project. The workshop facilitator needs to be effective at managing the workshop but does not need greater expertise than the other participants. It could be run as a joint professional development session. 

The workshop takes 3 hours. This is not an overlong time for supervision training. However, a considerable period at the start revisits the issues of transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research and participants spend 20 minutes working individually reflecting on the quality criteria developed in the project. If participants do make themselves familiar with the materials, they could complete the initial individual reflection (20 minutes) prior to the workshop, allowing more focus on shared discussion.

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies: Workshop facilitator slides

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Workshop Facilitator Slides Download Document (3.21 MB)

 

This document is one of the outcomes resulting from a project focused on developing high quality outcomes and quality evaluation processes in transdisciplinary/ interdisciplinary research for use by students and supervisors. The project resulted in several outcomes that can be used together or independently including: a summary report; identification of quality criteria; and a toolbox of ideas for good practice. 

This resource provides PowerPoint presentation materials to be used with the workshop resource in transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research supervision training. The PowerPoint materials provide the background and sequence materials for the Workshop activities in the accompanying resource. They provide a structured pathway through the project outcomes, workshop activities and times for reflection and evaluation of outcomes. They can be followed exactly as provided to run professional development within a university department or across university departments. Facilitation skills are then more necessary for the workshop leader than previous expertise in effective pedagogy for transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research supervision. 

The evaluation of the Workshop activities noted that considerable time is allocated to revisiting the overall issue of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research with 20 minutes for initial individual reflection on the quality criteria. If participants gain familiarity with the main project outcome documents and complete their initial individual reflections prior to the workshop, less time would be needed and more joint discussion could be the focus. 

Some university staff may not feel comfortable using a PowerPoint presentation prepared by another person. An option would be to work more directly from the substantial resource documents of the project (quality criteria; ideas for practice) to prepare a tailored workshop activity. The provided workshop and PowerPoint materials could provide thought-starters. The origins of the materials would still need appropriate academic acknowledgement.

Educating the Net Generation - A Handbook of Findings for Practice and Policy

Gregor Kennedy, Barney Dalgarno, Sue Bennett, Kathleen Gray, Jenny Waycott, Terry Judd, Andrea Bishop, Karl Maton, Kerri-Lee Krause, Rosemary Chang
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Handbook Download Document (5.96 MB)

Educating the Net Generation - A Toolkit of Resources for Educators in Australian Universities

Kathleen Gray, Gregor Kennedy, Jenny Waycott, Barney Dalgarno, Sue Bennett, Rosemary Chang, Terry Judd, Andrea Bishop, Karl Maton, Kerri-Lee Krause
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Toolkit Download Document (7.87 MB)

Student Feedback and Leadership: Resource Portfolio

James Barber, Sandra Jones, Brenda Novak
RMIT University
2009
RMIT University
Resource portfolio Download Document (2.02 MB)

New technologies, new pedagogies: using mobile technologies to develop new ways of teaching and learning

University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Final Report Download Document (5.87 MB)

Leading Courses: Academic Leadership for Course Coordinators

Sue Jones, Richard Ladyshewsky, Beverley Oliver, Helen Flavell
Curtin University of Technology
2009
Curtin University of Technology
QUT, RMIT, UniSA, UTS
Final report Download Document (2.2 MB)

Peer Review of Teaching in Australian Higher Education

Dr Kerri-Lee Harris, Dr Kelly Farell, Associate Professor Maureen Bell, Associate Professor Marcie Devlin, Professor Richard James
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
Peer Review of Teaching in Australian Higher Education: Resources to support institutions in developing and embedding effective policies and practices

The National Graduate Attributes Project Issues papers

Simon Barrie, Clair Hughes, Calvin Smith
The University of Sydney
2009
The University of Sydney

Introductory Commentary

This resource forms part of a larger collection.  It is recommended that readers refer also to:

1.  http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au/projects/nationalgap/resources/gamap/introduction.htm
and
2. http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au/projects/nationalgap/resources/videos.htm

This is a collection of eight issues to consider in the renewal of learning and teaching experiences.

The National Graduate Attributes Project (GAP), a national scoping study of Australian Universities' recent activities in relation to the development of graduate attributes underpins the project.

The papers provide an introduction to each of the key elements identified as being important for universities to consider when engaging in curriculum renewal to achieve graduate attributes. Each paper is short and points to additional references. The eight elements of the institutional framework are not independent and recommended by the authors to be read in sequence. The papers are presented as starting points for reflection.

The eight papers focus on (1) Conceptualisation, (2) Stakeholders, (3) Implementation, (4) Curriculum, (5) Assessment, (6) Quality Assurance, (7) Staff Development, and (8) Student Centred. They are most helpful to those involved in considering whole of institution (or faculty) approaches to Graduate Attributes implementation. They make a good starting point and are easily downloadable separately or as one PDF document.

Good practice guide for handling complaints and appeals in Australian universities

Jim Jackson, Helen Fleming, Patty Kamvounias, Sally Varnham
Southern Cross University
2009
Southern Cross University
Sydney, UTS
Good Practice Guide Download Document (1.18 MB)

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies: Ideas for good practice

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Ideas for Good Practice Download Document (643.88 KB)

 

This document is one of the outcomes resulting from a project focused on developing high quality outcomes and quality evaluation processes in transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research for use by students and supervisors. Experienced supervisors and students participated in workshop discussions on transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research. Research literature on effective supervision was also examined. 

The project identified seven criteria to evaluate quality transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research outcomes. This resource presents practical ideas to support quality research supervision. The intended reader is the research supervisor aiming to guide student research development. Students could also work from the ideas directly. 

Ideas for Practice presents 48 ideas or tools aligned into seven sections: Building Supervision Relationships; Positioning Yourself; Deepening Reflection; Engaging with Literature; Increasing External/Critical Engagement; Clarifying Research Question/ Research Focus; Distilling & Communicating Your Claims; and Structuring a Coherent Argument. The discussion relates each of the ideas to the quality criteria for transciplinary/interdisciplinary research study. 

Every idea is presented on a single page with very simple statements addressing the same key points: What's the big idea; Why is this such a good idea; Which criteria does this address; When might this be useful; What would it take to make this work; What resources might help. The ideas range from very specific, eg, Elevator Pitches (p. 49) to more general, eg, Write as a Student-Supervisor Team (p. 5). However, general ideas provide specific guidance on implementation. As Cynthia Mitchell notes, the document can be read from cover to cover or dipped into for ideas on specific issues. 

This resource can constitute a standalone professional development resource for supervisors to work through with their students. While suitable for experienced supervisors, it is likely to be of particular value to new supervisors looking for advice to assist their students.  

A very useful summary of activities to enhance student completion of quality research work in a timely manner is provided. While some aspects are specifically tied to transciplinary/interdisciplinary research studies, the ideas have generic applicability. The author also asks for feedback on the usefulness of the ideas and additional suggestions for resources or modifications.

Project EnROLE Blue Report: encouraging role based online learning environments

Sandra Wills, Elizabeth Rosser, Elizabeth Devonshire, Elyssebeth Leigh, Carol Russell, John Shepherd
University of Wollongong
2009
University of Wollongong
Macquarie, Sydney, UNSW, UTS
Final report Download Document (11.84 MB)

Developing multilevel leadership in the use of student feedback to enhance student learning and teaching practice

James Barber, Sandra Jones, Brenda Novak
RMIT University
2009
RMIT University
Final report Download Document (1.68 MB)

Promoting learning and teaching communities

Denise Higgins
The Australian National University
2009
The Australian National University
Final Report Download Document (8.42 MB)

Educating the Net Generation: Implications for Learning and Teaching in Australian Universities

Gregor Kennedy, Kerri-Lee Krause, Karl Maton, Andrea Bishop, Rosemary Chang, Jenny Waycott, Terry Judd, Kathleen Gray, Sue Bennett, Barney Dalgarno
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
CSU, Griffith, Sydney, UoW
Final report Download Document (2.06 MB)

Digital learning communities: investigating the application of social software to support networked learning

Robert Fitzgerald, James Steele
University of Canberra
2009
University of Canberra
QUT, RMIT
Final Report Download Document (1.35 MB)

Research graduate skills project

Jim Cumming, Margaret Kiley, Mandy Thomas, Linda Hort, Merrilyn Pike, Elizabeth Evans, Anicca Main
The Australian National University
2009
The Australian National University
Final report Download Document (2.57 MB)

The ReMarks PDF Markup Editor: Stage 1

Stephen Colbran
2009
Deakin, Monash, UWS
Final report Download Document (1018.72 KB)

Learning and Teaching for Interprofessional Practice, Australia: Developing interprofessional learning and practice capabilities within the Australian health workforce - a proposal for building capacity within the higher education sector

Cheryl Bell, Roger Dunston, Gillian Nisbet, Terry Fitzgerald, Rosalie Pockett, Geof Hawke, Jill White, Alison Lee, Jill Thistlethwaite, Diana Slade, Adrian Lee, Lynda Matthews
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Sydney
Project report with Appendix 1 - Key activities and Appendix 2 - Operational plan Download Document (814.39 KB)
Appendix 3 - Consultation document Download Document (2.03 MB)
Appendix 4 - Final proposal Download Document (3.4 MB)

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