Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

32 resources found for ‘arts’.

Employability of Bachelor of Arts graduates

Nick Harvey, Mosharefa Shahjahan
The University of Adelaide
2013
The University of Adelaide
Flinders University, James Cook University, The University of Sydney, University of Otago (NZ)
Final Report Download Document (3.95 MB)

Future-Proofing the Creative Arts in Higher Education

Su Baker, Brad Buckley, Giselle Kett
The University of Melbourne
2009
The University of Melbourne
Final Report Download Document (936.67 KB)

Evaluation of Teaching and Learning Delivery Modes in Arts

Jim Peterson, Le Ha Phan, Matthew Piscioneri, Jim Hlavac
Monash University
2009
Monash University
Final report Download Document (3.28 MB)

Scoping study for a national new media/electronic arts network

Jeremy Blank
Curtin University of Technology
2009
Curtin University of Technology
Monash, UoW
Final Report Download Document (3.64 MB)

Learning Outcomes and Curriculum Development in Psychology

The University of Queensland
2006
The University of Queensland
Stage 1 Report Download Document (423 KB)
Final Report Download Document (739.17 KB)

Australian Writing Programs Network

Professor Jennifer Webb
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra
QUT, UNE
Final report Download Document (3.3 MB)

Nature and roles of arts degrees in contemporary society (DASSH)

Deanne Gannaway, Professor Faith Trent
Flinders University
2008
Flinders University

 Six summary reports accompany the Final Report for the Bachelor of Arts Scoping Project

1 Executive summary

2 What is the Australian BA?

Defining and describing the nature and role of the Arts in contemporary Australia.

This summary report presents definitions and program models developed through the BA scoping project.

3 Mapping the terrain: Trends and shared features in BA programs across Australia 2001–2008

This report summarises the key trends and commonalities evident between Bachelor of Arts programs and programs within the fi eld of Arts currently offered across Australia.

4 Who is enrolled in the Australian BA?

Student uptake of the Australian BA 2001–2006

This summary report presents the key findings from the BA scoping project that document the trends in student uptake of programs within the field of Arts offered across Australia.

5 Who is delivering the Australian BA?

Trends in staff profiles in the BA 2001–2006

This summary report presents national staffing trends within BA programs across Australia. The project drew upon demographic data collected for DEST/DEEWR gathered during 2001 – 2006.

6 Future studies emerging from the BA scoping project

This summary report presents an outcome of the BA scoping project: the identification of areas requiring further investigation and the development of interventions to enhance the experience of Bachelor of Arts students.

Final Report Download Document (619.74 KB)
Executive Summary Download Document (199.02 KB)
Summary Report 2 Download Document (211.29 KB)
Summary Report 3 Download Document (256.56 KB)
Summary Report 4 Download Document (162.93 KB)
Summary Report 5 Download Document (168.69 KB)
Summary Report 6 Download Document (142.94 KB)

Peer Instruction in the humanities

Dr Sam Butchart, Dr Toby Handfield, Professor John Bigelow
Monash University
2007
Monash University
Final Report Download Document (563.22 KB)

Studio Teaching Project: Four Reports

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS

Learning environments that work for tertiary music performance students and staff

Heather Monkhouse
University of Tasmania
2010
University of Tasmania
Fellowship Report Download Document (296.06 KB)

Teaching sociology in Australia

Helen Marshall, Peter Robinson, John Germov, Eileen Clark
RMIT University
2009
RMIT University
La Trobe, UoN
Final Report Download Document (1.45 MB)

Forward thinking: teaching and learning philosophy in Australia

Eliza Goddard, Susan Dodds, Ian Ravenscroft
Flinders University
2010
Flinders University
Macquarie, UoW
Final Report Download Document (375.9 KB)

Benchmarking archaeology degrees at Australian universities: Final Report

Associate Professor Wendy Beck, Ms Catherine Clarke
2008

The purpose of the project is to formulate a list of achievement standards for Australian Honours graduates in Archaeology. By project end, a nationally agreed public document, developed collaboratively by all Australian university providers of Archaeology, will be produced and disseminated. The project methodology should be transferable to other disciplines.

Final Report Download Document (294.76 KB)

Promoting the Sharing and Reuse of Technology-Supported Learning Designs. ALTC Associate Fellowship Report

Professor Ron Oliver
Edith Cowan University
2008
Edith Cowan University
The Technology-Supported Learning Database is designed to make effective technology-facilitated teaching ideas, reusable and sharable. The database seeks to share good teaching ideas. The learning activities in this database have been supplied by teachers who are keen to see them used freely by others.
Final Report Download Document (3.75 MB)

Dancing Between Diversity and Consistency: Evaluating Assessment in Postgraduate Studies in Dance

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University

The project aims to refine a code of assessment for postgraduate research studies in dance in Australia, encompassing the two primary modes of investigation, written and practice-based theses, their distinctiveness and their potential interplay. The code will facilitate best practice in assessment for higher degree studies in dance and related creative arts’ disciplines.

Deakin, QUT
Final report Download Document (616.97 KB)

The Report on the research project, 'Dancing with Diversity and Consistency: Refining Assessment in Post Graduate Degrees in Dance', provides useful information regarding the research methodology employed in the development of the project’s guidelines, which are articulated through its primary research outcomes: the website and booklet.  In reflecting on the very recent history of dance in tertiary contexts, its ‘fledgling status in postgraduate contexts’, and the research methodologies employed, the report succinctly outlines some of the key formulations around research degrees: the transition from dependence to independence; the question of how to assess embodiment in the context of higher degree research; as well as the variations to approach and methodology encountered throughout the course of the project. The report also looks at the factors that contributed to the project’s success as well as those that impeded progress. The report is generous in its acknowledgement of contributing stakeholders, and candid in reflecting on the variations and/or limitations that manifested throughout the research process, and which are likely to influence future developments in creative arts research. By also acknowledging the temporal and/or dynamic nature of the research undertaken, the researchers leave the way open for discussion, dialogue and the whole question of knowledge throughout the expanded field of dance and choreographic practices in particular, and the creative and performing arts in general.

Zen and the art of transdisciplinary postgraduate studies

Cynthia Mitchell
University of Technology, Sydney
2009
University of Technology, Sydney
Fellowship Final Report Download Document (451.58 KB)

This is the Summary Report for a project focused on developing an evaluative frame for the formative and summative outputs of transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research for use by students and supervisors. While the project title focuses on postgraduate studies, the project focus is applicable to any such research activity, including undergraduate papers. It provides helpful information in a learning and teaching area that is a current and growing practice, but with little practical guidance for either supervisors or students. Transdisciplinary/interdisciplinary research is growing in Australia as researchers appreciate the value of working across disciplines to be relevant to the complexity of real life applications of research knowledge. The core question of this project is the development of ways to evaluate the outcomes of such research, whether a thesis or research paper, along with formative processes to guide supervisors and students to quality outcomes. Reading the Summary Report can be of value for two purposes. Firstly, it gives information on the conduct of a major learning and teaching development activity that others planning such an activity could find useful, including the process of a large action research project. The second purpose is that it explains the theoretical underpinnings of the project, including a review of research literature informing the overall project. The practical outcomes from the project are provided in separate resource documents: Quality Criteria; Ideas for Good Practice; Workshop Resources; Workshop Facilitator Slides. These resources can be used separately to guide supervision practice, or together to run an actual workshop on the topic.The Summary Report has a clear writing style. As the report is necessarily brief and addresses the whole conduct and outcomes of the project, some readers may find the theoretical explanations underpinning the project, provided in one and a half pages, dense. However, this brief explanation provides a number of research references that could guide further reading by a person interested in this area of teaching and learning.

Learning Outcomes and Curriculum Development in Psychology

The University of Queensland
2006
The University of Queensland
Final Report Download Document (739.17 KB)
Stage 1 Report Download Document (423 KB)

Quality assessment: linking assessment tasks and teaching outcomes in the social sciences: Final Report

Jennifer Gore, James Ladwig, Wendy Elsworth, Hywel Ellis, Robert Parkes, Tom Griffiths
The University of Newcastle
2009
The University of Newcastle
Final Report Download Document (636.62 KB)

 

The report uses the concept of ‘authentic pedagogy’, which has been developed from earlier work. This purports to measure demonstration of disciplinary depth, depth of analysis, richness of communication and the extent to which problematic nature of knowledge is recognised. The report is dense but well referenced and examines correlation between assessment tasks and standards, as well as providing an ‘audit’ of the quality of assessment tasks. It suggests that it provides explicit criteria which lecturers can use to measure specific achievement in their subject area. The sample size is small and self selected; all are in social sciences, except for the odd inclusion of languages. The results are statistically analysed to ensure validity, although the variance may be questionable. 
The assessment task quality descriptors provide a useful framework for those designing assessment tasks although the meta-language criterion is, in the reviewers view, tied to the philosophical underpinnings and may confuse those unfamiliar with it or provide an issue for those who do not accept this stance. The strength of the report lies in the clarity with which the descriptors and the authentic achievement scales are described and in the examples which are included in the report. The results of the study usefully show that tasks which are intellectually challenging and engaging produce work which is consistent with broad academic standards (although these are not  defined).  The approach using a variety of inputs, including workshops, development of a tertiary assessment practice guide and scoring manual make this a much needed additional resource which could assist in improving assessment in universities in the Social Sciences. Its complexity and less obvious applicability for assessment in the humanities may make it less accessible for some academics.

Uncovering theology: the depth, reach and utility of Australian theological education

Charles Sherlock, Mark Harding, Neil Ormerod, Robert McIver, Gerard Moore
Australian Catholic University
2009
Australian Catholic University
Final Report Download Document (414.05 KB)
Book (ISBN 9781921511806) Download Document (3.94 MB)

Designing a diverse, future-orientated vision for undergraduate psychology in Australia

Jacquelyn Cranney, Stephen Provost, Mary Katsikitis, Frances Martin, Fiona White, Lynne Cohen
The University of New South Wales
2008
The University of New South Wales
ECU, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (708.26 KB)

This impressive resource, developed following extensive consultations with key stakeholders, presents a comprehensive list of key attributes psychology students can develop during their undergraduate studies. By extending the principles of the scientist-practitioner model, there is no doubt that it will become a valuable research-led resource for both students and teachers of psychology.

This resource clearly delineates what will be learned, how it will be learned, what the learning outcomes will be, and how these apply in both the traditional psychology laboratory and in real world settings. This juxtaposition of laboratory and real world learning applications provides added value by challenging students to think more widely. In doing so, it enhances the identity of psychology. Accordingly, the resource is also relevant to students and teachers in Psychiatry and the allied health disciplines.

It may be necessary, however, to make explicit the academic background required for using this resource.  For example, it may be essential to flag that empirical skills are a pre-requisite given that Research Methods in Psychology (Attribute 2) are traditionally quantitative. That undergraduate students are becoming interested in qualitative research approaches raises the question of why this is not included in Attribute 2. This is even more questionable given the learning outcome of describing and applying the different research methods used by psychologists and demonstrating practical skills in laboratory-based and other psychological research.

The theoretical orientation and attributes reflect the resource's orientation to a specific cohort of students, which in this discipline is not necessarily a bad thing.

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