Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

20 resources found.

An adaptive e-learning community of practice for mechanics courses in engineering

M.Asif Khawaja
The University of New South Wales
2013
The University of New South Wales
University of Tasmania, University of Technology Sydney, University of Wollongong
Final Report Download Document (3.62 MB)

Learning and teaching technical competence in the Built Environment using serious video game technology

Sidney Newton, Russell Lowe
The University of New South Wales
2013
The University of New South Wales
Final report Download Document (2.08 MB)

After standards: Engaging and embedding history standards using international best practice to inform curriculum renewal

Sean Brawley, Jennifer Clark, Chris Dixon, Lisa Ford, Erik Nielsen, Shawn Ross, Stuart Upton
The University of New South Wales
2013
The University of New South Wales
The University of Queensland, University of New England
Final report Download Document (4.3 MB)

National Standards for Psychological Literacy and Global Citizenship: Outcomes of Undergraduate Psychology Education

Jacquelyn Cranney, Lorayne Botwood, Sue Morris
The University of New South Wales
2012
The University of New South Wales

New media to develop graduate attributes of science students

Will Rifkin, Nancy Longnecker, Joan Leach, Lloyd Davis
The University of New South Wales
2012
The University of New South Wales
The University of Queensland, The University of Western Australia, University of Otago (NZ)
Final report Download Document (925.88 KB)

Physclips II - Waves and sound: an integrated set of multi-level multimedia resources and laboratory experiments: Website

Joe Wolfe, George Hatsidimitris, John Smith
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales

Delivering optometric graduates ready for practice beyond the cities and ready to serve an ageing population

Barbara Junghans, Helen Dalton (editors)
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (5.44 MB)
Curriculum Materials Download Document (2.32 MB)

Physclips II - Waves and sound: an integrated set of multi-level multimedia resources and laboratory experiments: Final Report

Joe Wolfe, George Hatsidimitris, John Smith
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (8.91 MB)

Learning to teach online: developing high-quality video and text resources to help educators teach online

Simon McIntyre
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (5.4 MB)

Design based curriculum reform within engineering education

Carl Reidsema, Rosalie Goldsmith
The University of New South Wales
2011
The University of New South Wales
Queensland University of Technology, The University of Melbourne, The University of Queensland, The University of Sydney
Download Document (614.72 KB)

Studio Teaching Project: Four Reports

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS

Studio Teaching Toolkit

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS

An excellent informative and helpful description of, and guide to studio practice with particular reference to art architecture and design and broader application to studio practice in dance, music and drama. The resource will be of interest to design and problem solving disciplines such as engineering and computer science.

Volume One: STP Final Report of the Studio Teaching Toolkit are particularly useful for teachers and learners, Heads of School, Deans of Faculties, Facilities Management personnel and tertiary providers considering the review or introduction of new art and/or design courses. The value of these materials lies in the descriptions of the nature and defining characteristics of studio practice, the elucidation of the conditions and modes that lead to effective learning outcomes and effective methods of assessment and feedback for studio practice.

The Studio Teaching Toolkit applies the findings contained in the three reports (Volumes1 to 3) and case studies (Volume 4) into concise and practical information arranged into six sections: Using the toolkit; What is Studio; Effective Strategies; Assessment and Feedback; Student Experience; Case Studies.

Part six of Volume One (pp 93--100) provides a succinct description of the project and the four fundamental questions the project explored. Along with the Executive Summary (pp v-ix) and Recommendations (pp x-xii) users, and in particular teachers of art and design, should refer to the Studio Teaching Toolkit http://studioteaching.org/ for practical and concise resource materials.

Contained in the Effective Strategies section of the Studio Teaching Toolkit are 10 benchmark statements for effective studio practice relating to issues of culture, mode, program and space. These ten statements are particularly useful for courses and unit/subject level review and quality assurance processes.

Curriculum development in studio teaching

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS
Final Report, Cover Download Document (3.98 MB)
Final Report, Volume 1 Download Document (1.19 MB)
Final Report, Volume 2 Download Document (1.25 MB)
Final Report, Volume 3 Download Document (453.85 KB)
Final Report, Volume 4 Download Document (9.33 MB)

Virtual microscopy for enhancing learning and teaching

Rakesh Kumar, Gary Velan, Patrick de Permentier, Paul Adam, Stephen Bonser, Michael Beal
The University of New South Wales
2009
The University of New South Wales
Final report Download Document (1.88 MB)

Sustainable and Evidence-based Learning and Teaching Approaches to the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum

Dr Jacquelyn Cranney
The University of New South Wales
2008
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (1.09 MB)
Executive Summary Download Document (66.6 KB)
ALTC Exchange - Psychology Undergraduate Resources Download Document (1010.43 KB)
ALTC Exchange and the APEN Forum Download Document (656.69 KB)

The RED Report - Recognition, Enhancement, Development - The contribution of sessional teachers to higher education

Alisa Percy, Michele Scoufis, Sharon Parry, Allan Goody, Margaret Hicks, Ian Macdonald, Kay Martinez, Nick Szorenyi-Reischl, Yoni Ryan, Sandra Wills, Lynn Sheridan
The University of New South Wales
2008
The University of New South Wales
ACU National, JCU, SCU, UNE, UniSA, UoW, UWA
The RED Report Download Document (380.93 KB)
The RED Resource Download Document (799.5 KB)

Designing a diverse, future-orientated vision for undergraduate psychology in Australia

Jacquelyn Cranney, Stephen Provost, Mary Katsikitis, Frances Martin, Fiona White, Lynne Cohen
The University of New South Wales
2008
The University of New South Wales
ECU, Sydney
Final Report Download Document (708.26 KB)

This impressive resource, developed following extensive consultations with key stakeholders, presents a comprehensive list of key attributes psychology students can develop during their undergraduate studies. By extending the principles of the scientist-practitioner model, there is no doubt that it will become a valuable research-led resource for both students and teachers of psychology.

This resource clearly delineates what will be learned, how it will be learned, what the learning outcomes will be, and how these apply in both the traditional psychology laboratory and in real world settings. This juxtaposition of laboratory and real world learning applications provides added value by challenging students to think more widely. In doing so, it enhances the identity of psychology. Accordingly, the resource is also relevant to students and teachers in Psychiatry and the allied health disciplines.

It may be necessary, however, to make explicit the academic background required for using this resource.  For example, it may be essential to flag that empirical skills are a pre-requisite given that Research Methods in Psychology (Attribute 2) are traditionally quantitative. That undergraduate students are becoming interested in qualitative research approaches raises the question of why this is not included in Attribute 2. This is even more questionable given the learning outcome of describing and applying the different research methods used by psychologists and demonstrating practical skills in laboratory-based and other psychological research.

The theoretical orientation and attributes reflect the resource's orientation to a specific cohort of students, which in this discipline is not necessarily a bad thing.

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales

Despite its key position as an enabling discipline, physics content in school and university curricula is decreasing at an alarming rate. There is a real need for essential physics principles to be made widely available to an increasingly diverse group of students and academics. The Physclips package provides an excellent resource that specifically fills this critical gap. This is a very visual, engaging and easy to use introductory series into major physics principles. It takes an unashamedly rigorous approach. One of the outstanding features is the links to explain in an integrated manner, the mathematical principles supporting the physics. Other key features are the use of tutorials and animations. There is a very strong pedagogical foundation. For example, the authors have taken into account cognitive load theory, the use of narration to reinforce the animation and current web design approaches to produce this very sophisticated tool. The modules go into a good level of depth and detail and are designed such that they can be done at an individual’s own pace. This resource will be of use to anyone who wants and alternative platform to learn about the basics of physics and can be used either to support physics classes or to provide refresher or learning activities. Potential users include university and later year school students as well as teacher and academics who would like to refresh their knowledge. From a pedagogical perspective, these clips also act as excellent examples of how physics can be taught in an approachable and engaging manner. This is a user friendly interface that loads quickly and is readily navigable. It is also released through Creative Commons so there are no fees associated with its use. The videos require a Flash player. The clips currently cover Mechanics, Waves and Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. It is not clear whether further modules are planned. There are many physics videos and online resources available on the internet, but these Physclips packages are of the highest standard and will retain their relevance for many years to come.

Physclips - multi-level, multi-media resources for teaching first year university physics: Final Report

George Hatsidimitris, Joe Wolfe
The University of New South Wales
2007
The University of New South Wales
Final Report Download Document (559.07 KB)

Environmental engineering electronic text (ENVETEXT)

Tony Webb
The University of New South Wales
1997
The University of New South Wales
Final report for a 1997 National Teaching Development Grant (CUTSD).
Final report Download Document (24.15 KB)