Resource Library

The Resource Library contains a collection of higher education learning and teaching materials flowing from projects funded by the Commonwealth of Australia including those from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council.

Results may be sorted filtered by keywords.

7 resources found.

Studio Teaching Project: Four Reports

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS

Studio Teaching Toolkit

Associate Professor Robert Zehner, Dr Graham Forsyth, Elizabeth Musgrave, Douglas Neale, Associate Professor Barbara de la Harpe, Dr Fiona Peterson, Noel Frankham, Stephanie Wilson, Karin Watson
The University of New South Wales
2010
The University of New South Wales
RMIT, UQ, UTAS

An excellent informative and helpful description of, and guide to studio practice with particular reference to art architecture and design and broader application to studio practice in dance, music and drama. The resource will be of interest to design and problem solving disciplines such as engineering and computer science.

Volume One: STP Final Report of the Studio Teaching Toolkit are particularly useful for teachers and learners, Heads of School, Deans of Faculties, Facilities Management personnel and tertiary providers considering the review or introduction of new art and/or design courses. The value of these materials lies in the descriptions of the nature and defining characteristics of studio practice, the elucidation of the conditions and modes that lead to effective learning outcomes and effective methods of assessment and feedback for studio practice.

The Studio Teaching Toolkit applies the findings contained in the three reports (Volumes1 to 3) and case studies (Volume 4) into concise and practical information arranged into six sections: Using the toolkit; What is Studio; Effective Strategies; Assessment and Feedback; Student Experience; Case Studies.

Part six of Volume One (pp 93--100) provides a succinct description of the project and the four fundamental questions the project explored. Along with the Executive Summary (pp v-ix) and Recommendations (pp x-xii) users, and in particular teachers of art and design, should refer to the Studio Teaching Toolkit http://studioteaching.org/ for practical and concise resource materials.

Contained in the Effective Strategies section of the Studio Teaching Toolkit are 10 benchmark statements for effective studio practice relating to issues of culture, mode, program and space. These ten statements are particularly useful for courses and unit/subject level review and quality assurance processes.

Assessing group work in media and communications

Dr Greg Battye, Dr Ian Hart, Dr Coralie McCormack, Dr Peter Donnan
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra

In Media and Communications, authentic tasks are the basis of learning through assessment. Media production in the real world is almost always a collaborative process. Hence, authentic assessment tasks require student to collaborate in groups. Collaborative group work effectively fosters both discipline-specific and generic professional attributes if carefully devised and managed. The project team identified common target areas for improvement, constructed and tested a range of practical tools and techniques for improving assessment in these areas, disseminated results and the products to the Media and Communication teaching community and are providing an online forum for on-going evolution, discussion, testing and feedback by the teaching community.

Macquarie, UNSW

The main focus of the resource is group assessment relevant to a range of disciplines, for example media, communication, creative arts and medical disciplines. It includes 13 case studies (of majors from four universities), explores key issues in relation to group assessment, and includes links to the research literature and keynotes by leading authorities in assessment. The resource is useful for academic staff designing units, courses and programs and who may be intending to incorporate group work. The case studies are useful for both design and assessment samples and for benchmarking purposes. Video is used to develop the key issues: a rationale for group assessment; creating and managing groups; group marks; peer assessment; technology; transparency; and feedback. The presence of both staff and student views and experiences in the video material imparts a particular level of credibility to the discussion of issues and principles. Keynote addresses, on policy, design, implementation, evaluation and learning, from leading authorities in assessment principles, and the practice of group and collaborative assessment, are also included. The case studies are of particular interest to course, unit and program designers as well as academic developers and planning and quality staff, while the issues are of interest to all staff grappling with collaborative or group assessment. The videos, for example those in relation to the rationale for team work, may also be of benefit to students. Users should be made aware of the login link to the forum, an issue which may detract from the website's currency. The resource recognises the competing demands on the user's time and the cognitive load requirements though an accessible design template (using three main and four supplementary links), the use of short videos, and the links to the research literature.  The user does not require prior experience, domain-specific knowledge or specific IT requirements to use the resource. The resource deals with the problematic issue of group assessment and solves key issues in a concise and user-friendly way. It is easy to read and navigate and does not need to be read in conjunction with the project report. It is a practical, easy-to-access and use website on group assessment and team work.

Dancing between Diversity and Consistency

Dr Maggi Phillips, Associate Professor Cheryl Stock, Associate Professor Kim Vincs
Edith Cowan University
2009
Edith Cowan University
Deakin, QUT

The overall project (website, booklet and report) aims to provide clear guidelines for the assessment and examination of postgraduate research degrees in dance. By extension, the project establishes a flexible yet rigorous framework for supervisors and HDR students, particularly in its discussion of terms such as: practice-based research, practice-led research, practice as research, performance as research, creative practice as research, creative arts research  and research through practice. Consequently, whilst the discipline focus is dance, this resource contributes to broader discussions around research, research training, and assessment and examination in the Creative and Performing Arts. In outlining key terms, classifications and shared characteristics, the website promotes the research findings (assessment guidelines) and establishes the fundamental need for research candidates to establish a ‘research design framework’ that rigorously articulates individual research methodology/s and outlines benchmark indicators for examiners. Importantly, the increasingly overlapping spheres of professional and academic practice are recognised, and whilst understood as particularly characteristic of dance, it is arguable that the nexus between academic and professional practice is one of the distinguishing characteristic of the creative and performing arts disciplines within the university sector.  An important discussion encompasses entry pathways for creative and performing artists and particularly the need for professional equivalence for those mature practitioners who have a substantial body of advanced professional practice, or who can demonstrate high artistic attainment. This is in contradistinction to the more conventional academic pathway of less mature practitioners, who in moving directly from first class Honours into a research masters or doctorate, often do so without the benefit of industry or life experience. A consequence of this discussion is the useful distinction between creative doctorates with an exegetical component, the multi-modal thesis, and more traditional, humanities style theses. A paradigm shift is identified whereby ‘practice’ is understood as supplanting the more traditional, scholarly descriptions about its practice, thereby problematising conventional examination and assessment protocols. The website includes several short video excerpts of works created by dance artists and choreographers as part of their postgraduate research, and even more usefully, a database of Australian dance theses, which it proposes to maintain and update. A bibliography is also included in the ‘About’ section. The website details guidelines and protocols around the preparation and submission of HDR theses, making it a one-stop shop for scholars, candidates and examiners undertaking research inquiries through creative practice.

Bridging gaps in music teacher education: developing exemplary practice models using peer collaboration

Julie Ballantyne, Scott Harrison, Margaret Barrett, Nita Temmerman
Griffith University
2009
Griffith University
CSU, UQ, UTAS
Final Report Download Document (908.08 KB)

Australian Writing Programs Network

Professor Jennifer Webb
University of Canberra
2008
University of Canberra
QUT, UNE
Final report Download Document (3.3 MB)

Learning environments that work for tertiary music performance students and staff

Heather Monkhouse
University of Tasmania
2010
University of Tasmania
Fellowship Report Download Document (296.06 KB)